1993 Changes

The Kavanagh’s. 6 Kensington Parkway. December 1991 .

January 4

Another year begins at the Joseph Kavanagh Company. My sister Ann, brother Jack and I are the fifth generation of Kavanagh’s to work here and run the place. We have a few jobs on the books to start, a small order from Dan’s Welding and a larger one for Miscellaneous Metals. We also finish a job for Krug & Son, another very old metals business in Baltimore. The winter is generally our slowest time but we receive a few orders in this first week for Anchor Fence, Miscellaneous and a few others. We also have some heater work coming up: a re-tubing of a heat exchanger for the Housing Authority and a set of the copper u-bends themselves for Harvey Stambaugh & Sons.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Dan’s Welding job. January 4, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. G. Krug and Son job. January 4, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Anchor Fence job. January 5, 1993.
The Shop’s job book entry. Housing Authority of Baltimore City job. January 6, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Harvey A. Stambaugh and Sons job. January 7, 1993.

January 15

It’s a typical day at the Shop and we send out jobs for L & S Welding and Kelco. In Florida, my sister JoAnn and her husband Carl Panetti welcome baby Katie Jean. Mom and Dad are in Florida with them and they call the Shop at lunch to give us the good news. Ann begins calling the sisters and the word spreads throughout the family. Katie Jean is my parents’ tenth grandchild. A birth is a joyful event for a family but my happiness is tempered when I receive a call from my friend Dave Muelhberger. He tells me John has taken his own life. We know a few John’s but I know who he means right away. John Muldowney. I stand up from my desk and stare at the cork board for a few seconds as it sinks in. It’s almost surreal. John grew up in my neighborhood and went to St. Elizabeth’s School. He was a year ahead of me. We played baseball as boys and have known each other since I was six or seven. I haven’t seen John in over a year and had discussed his absence with Dave on Halloween. Dave assumed he’d see John during the holidays but it didn’t happen. I tell Dave I’ll see him after work. I hang up and tell Jack and Ann,  then call Tim and Ray.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. L and S Welding job. January 15, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Kelco Company job. January 15, 1993.
Carl, JoAnn and Katie Jean Panetti. January 15, 1993.
JoAnn and Katie Jean Panetti. 1993.
Carl and Katie Jean Panetti. 1993.

January 16

Lethal Injection and a few other friends gather at the Belvedere to honor and remember our friend, John. We play a few songs, then we settle into a circle of chairs. We toast our fallen comrade and tell stories about him. I bring up the infamous “Double Forfeit” baseball game at Patterson Park and a very funny viewing of “Eating Raoul” at the Charles Theater that John and a few of us attended. We are shocked and saddened but we focus on remembering our friend. John was one of us. The troubles and issues he faced, we all have had to deal with on some level. This is our version of a wake and we smile as we think of John but they are the smiles that pop up suddenly then fade just as quickly. This crew of friends who have known each other since high school or earlier takes a hit and we have lost one of our own for the first time. On the drive home, I mull over what happened and I can’t wrap my head around it. There’s no explaining or understanding it. Later that night I make a decision, one that will be life-changing.

John Muldowney in St. Elizabeth’s uniform. Late 1970s.
John Muldowney and dog. Circa 1980.
John and sister Chris Muldowney. 1970s.
Frank Czawlytko and Joe Kavanagh. The Belvedere. 1993. Photo courtesy of Frank Czawlytko.

January 23

I have decided to ask out that cute girl from Seaboard Steel, Kim Dalfonzo and tonight is our first date. She’s very sweet and very pretty and quickly, I feel I’ve known her for years. She laughs at my jokes and makes me laugh. We go to Squire’s for a late dinner and sparks are flying right away. There’s something special about her I notice from the start. I think it’s her smile or her deep brown eyes but I’m not sure. I do know I want to find out.

Kim Dalfonzo. 1993.

January 29

It’s a cold week at the Shop and I hate the winter. I spend as much time as I can in the heated office this time of year but invariably, someone needs me in the Shop proper. Most of my day is back and forth from one to the other. The Shop takes care of a mix of small jobs for our regular local folks. We  have a large customer list but it’s primarily the same twenty-five or so who usually keep us rolling.

Carl and JoAnn Panetti with Carl’s stepmom, Terry Panetti holding Katie Jean. 1993.
Carl, JoAnn and Katie Jean Panetti. 1993.

January 31

Super Bowl Sunday arrives and the Dallas Cowboys beat the Bills 52-17. This one isn’t close at all but I’m not watching anyway. I’m practicing in the basement on Krueger Avenue with the rest of Lethal Injection. We run through the Wall then a few other tunes and then jam on some ideas for originals. Afterward, I head to my house and watch a new show premiering on NBC that is being filmed in Baltimore, Homicide: Life on the Streets.

February 2

Today is Groundhog Day and six more weeks of winter is predicted. The Shop on Central Avenue is a very cold place in February but being busy helps to warm up the building. We have work for Whiting Metals, Kelco, Price Brothers and several welding shops. I take a look at the upcoming schedule and we have orders for Warren-Ehret, Seaford Steel and a few more of our regulars. Not too bad for February.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Whiting Metals job. February 1, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Kelco Company job. February 1, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Price Brothers job. February 2, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Frank’s Welding job. February 3, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Warren-Ehret Company job. February 3, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Seaford Steel job. February 3, 1993.

February 14

Valentine’s Day is a Sunday and for the first time in my life, I have a date. Kim and I have dinner at Squire’s which is rather crowded but we both love the place. The food is terrific and it’s very close to my house. We seem to always have fun on our dates and I like Kim more each time I see her. When I drop her off at her parents’ house, I head home thinking tomorrow is Monday. We’ve got some work for A.J. Sackett, Lenderking and more heater tubes for Stambaugh to start the week at the Shop.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. A.J. Sackett and Sons job. February 16, 1993.
The Shop’s job book entry. Lenderking Metal Products job. February 8, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Harvey A. Stambaugh and Sons Company job. February 16, 1993.

February 16

Today the orders for Sackett and Lenderking are picked up and the Stambaugh heater tubes are bent in the old Leonard air bender. Tomorrow we have two structural jobs to handle. One is for Structural Steel Company and the other for the Charles Zuckerman and Sons Company.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Structural Steel Company. February 17, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Charles Zuckerman and Sons Company. February 17, 1993.

February 19

We finish a small job for an ornamental gate and when it’s picked up, we find out it’s for John Waters’ upcoming movie, “Serial Mom.” This often happens where we do a job and don’t really know the end user. The local production companies seem to change their names with each film so I had no idea. The movie work is always cool and I look forward to the film. I know I’ll see it.

February 24

February is finishing with a burst of work. We finish three jobs for J.C. Pardo & Sons and one for Ackerman and Baynes then begin work on a large set of copper u-bends for Stambaugh and Sons: eighty-four tubes. That’s a lot of annealing. That much torch work this time of year is a welcome site. The blow of torches brings some comfort to the corner of Pratt and Central for the next couple days. The tubes will be picked up tomorrow along with orders for Readybuilt, Solo Cup and Turnbull Enterprises

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. J.C. Pardo and Sons job. February 24, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. J.C. Pardo and Sons Company. February 24, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. J.C. Pardo and Sons job. February 24, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Ackerman and Baynes Fabricators job. February 24, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Harvey A. Stambaugh and Sons Company. February 25, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Readybuilt job. February 25, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Solo Cup Company job. February 25, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Turnbull Enterprises job. February 25, 1993.

March 3

The heat of our snapper torches continues to warm the place as we roll some aluminum angles for Antenna Research. These are aluminum and they must be annealed as well before rolling or they’ll break. The angles are coated in dirty motor oil then carefully a torch is waved along the piece. You must avoid keeping direct heat on aluminum as it can melt in a heart beat. The wielder of the torch receives the most benefit of warmth but all the boys appreciate it. The remainder of the crew work on jobs for A.K. Robins and F & M Machine. On deck, we have some work for Turnbull, Kelco, Pardo, Major Equipment and a new customer, Williams Enterprises.                                                                  

Antenna Research angles. Photo taken November 2020.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Antenna Research. March 3, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. A.K. Robins Company job. March 3, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. F and M Machine Company. March 3, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Turnbull Enterprises job. March 4, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Kelco Company job. March 4, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. J.C. Pardo and Sons Company. March 4, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Major Equipment Company. March 4, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Williams Enterprises job. March 4, 1993.

March 14

What will be called the Storm of the Century hits the East Coast of the US and that includes Baltimore. Fortunately, we get off fairly easy with just eleven inches of the white stuff though it is bitter cold. It also is a weekend so other than digging out on Monday, it has marginal effect on the Shop and we are very grateful. Much of the East Coast does not fair as well.

March 23

The Shop maintains its comfortable two week backlog with a wide mix of work for our regular customers. After lunch, I distribute jobs for Miscellaneous Metals and Anchor Fence. I pause for a few minutes and watch as a copper sprayer tube is rolled for Fountaincraft. It occurs to me that we have made these things for many years. My father told me the Shop has made tubes and parts for fountains far back into the coppersmith days. The tube is rolled into a circle then holes are drilled by the customer to allow water flow. In the past, the holes needed to be drilled first and it took a lot more heat and time. Now, it’s a very standard item for us. We have the tools and equipment to make it look easy. 

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Fountaincraft. March 23, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Misecellaneous Metals job. March 23, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Anchor Fencde job. March 23, 1993.

March 26

It’s a Friday and Kim and I go to the movies as that has become our standard date. We’ve seen “A Few Good Men,”  Jack Nicholson and Tom Cruise square off in a military trial film and “Alive” a movie about the tragic crash of a soccer team and their desperate cannibalism. Tonight we see “Maddog and Glory,” a banal pseudo mafia comedy which Bill Murray sleeps through and everyone else’s talent is successfully wasted.

April 5

The Baltimore Orioles welcome the Texas Rangers to Orioles Park for Opening Day and lose 7-4. Rick Sutcliffe starts as he did last year for the Birds but the results are not the same. The place is packed and sold out but the fans go home a little disappointed. When the game is over, I pack up my guitar and gear and head to Tim’s house for practice. On the way, I remember we have some aluminum angles for Antenna Research to anneal tomorrow. I’m glad it’s not summer. 

1993 MLB All-Star Game Program.
Antenna Research angles. Photo taken November 2020.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Antenna Research job. April 6, 1993.

April 7

Jack and I spend afternoon break in the Shop talking to all the crew. It’s the usual baseball talk this time of year and the opening day loss is discussed. As the boys disperse, my brother and I head upstairs to check the status of an order for Belfort Instruments. This is a recurring job of some square aluminum tubes that are bent in the New Pines Bender. These require annealing too and Jack has been overseeing this job directly. I double check if Jack needs any help but he has this one well in hand. I head down the steps and into the office. I call Codd, Parks Reliable Fabricators, Parrot Materials, and J. Martin Christ Company to arrange pick ups for each. After ten minutes on the phone, I begin calculating the tube bending schedule for a heat exchanger for the Housing Authority.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Belfort Instruments job. April 7, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Codd Fabricators job. April 7, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Parks Reliable Fabricators job. April 7, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Parrott Materials job. April 7, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. J. Martin Christ job. April 7, 1993.

April 8

Three orders for Miscellaneous Metals are completed. Last year, they had a big year with us and helped our sales quite a bit. This year is not like last but they still can be counted on for several jobs a month at the least. They have climbed the list of my favorite customers.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Miscellaneous Metals job. April 8, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Miscellaneous Metals job. April 8, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Miscellaneous Metals job. April 8, 1993.

April 26

The work has slowed a bit but the Shop on Central Avenue is still steady. We love a backlog but having one all year is unlikely. There are always slow times. We can only hope they are limited. Today we finish jobs for Anchor Fence, J.C. Pardo, DOVCO and A.K. Metal Fabricators. A.K. is a business from Virginia and they do primarily ornate fancy items, doorways, rails and such which are often brass as these are.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Anchor Fence job. April 26, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. J.C. Pardo and Sons job. April 26, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. DOVCO, Inc. job. April 26, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. A.K. Metal Fabricators job. April 26, 1993.

April 28

The Kavanagh’s especially my brother are disappointed again when the Washington Capitals lose in the Stanley Cup Playoffs 4 games to 2 to the New York Islanders. They are bumped out in the first round and the early exit is a surprise after finishing 2nd in the Patrick Division. It’s becoming a constant outcome and it can be frustrating as a fan but Jack is always resilient and loyal to this team he loves.

May 7

Spring has finally truly sprung and it’s a beautiful day in Baltimore. Ann, Jack and I order lunch from Haussner’s and I drive down and pick up turkey clubs for us. This is a little treat we give ourselves once or twice a month. We talk about the schedule and some bids we have out. Jack reminds me some bent pipes are ready for the G-S Company then updates me on a standing order we have from C.R. Daniels. These are short aluminum elbows we have made for them for years. C.R. sends in lengths and we cut them then bend all we can get out of each piece. The count is at 800 and that’s enough to schedule a delivery. 

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. G-S Company job. May 7, 1993.
The Shop’s job book entry. C.R. Daniels job. February 12, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. C.R. Daniels job. May 7, 1993.
C.R. Daniels aluminum elbos. Photo taken November 2020.

May 13

I sit at my desk going over some drawings and prepping the paperwork for a heater for Housing Authority but I’m a little distracted. Kim and I have been dating now for almost four months and her birthday, like mine, is next month. I try to figure out the perfect gift. Things are going great. We have fun and I’m happy when I’m with her.

The Shop’s job book entry. Housing Authority of Baltimore City job. May 12, 1993.

May 14

The R-6-S is put to the test today when two 5” X 1 1/2” steel flat bars are rolled the hardway for Price Brothers. These bars take a lot of torque to pull but the machine handles it well with the power cranked up. These big bars can be a challenge to handle. Extra care must be taken with chain falls and the hoist used to move them. We also complete another order of the aluminum angles for Antenna Research and a few other jobs. I spend a few minute filling out delivery tickets and my mind is on the band. Ray, Tim and I have decided to play at the open mike night at the 8 X 10 club downtown. We don’t have any contacts in bars or clubs and this seems like a logical step, probably one we should have taken a long time ago. 

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Price Brothers job. May 14, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Antenna Research job. May 14, 1993.

May 18

Lethal Injection plays the open mike at the 8 X 10 Club and it’s an unmitigated disaster. My guitar goes out of tune during Comfortably Numb and I can’t get it back until nearly the end. The mix is bad and no one can hear anything over the keyboards. The crowd is mostly indifferent and I am discouraged. We pack up and get out of there. We try to take it in stride realizing we were playing in a different environment but it stings.

June 3

It’s been several days of torch work at 201 S. Central. The crew were filling pipes with rosin and melting them out after rolling. That’s more heat being thrown around the building. Whiting Metals is the customer and they order these sets of pipes regularly. The Whiting jobs are good orders and they are sent out while we finish several jobs for Dundalk Ornamental Iron, Scriba Welding and Brady’s Welding.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Whiting Metals job. June 2, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Whiting Metals job. June 2, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Dundalk Ornamental Iron job. June 2, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Dundalk Ornamental Iron job. June 3, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Scriba Welding job. June 3, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Brady’s Welding job. June 3, 1993.

June 14

I take Kim to dinner and a movie for her birthday. I have settled on a charm bracelet for her present and she likes it. Kim and I are a couple now and I like it. We see each other as much as we can.

June 17

It’s my 28th birthday and I’m having dinner with Kim. The day seemed to drag by as we shipped out jobs for Turnbull, Thrifty, and Interstate Steel. When the day is finally over, I rush home and Kim and I have dinner at Squire’s to celebrate. It’s the first birthday I have looked forward to in a long time. I love the Shrimp Parm here and I’m starting to love this girl too.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Turnbull Enterprises job. June 17, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Thrifty Iron Works job. June 17, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Thrifty Iron Works job. June 17, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Interstate Steel Company job. June 17, 1993.
Baltimore Orioles ticket stuf. June 29, 1993.

July 6

We return from a brief Independence Day break to process orders from Kelco, W.R. Grace and Simkins Industries. In addition, the men work on a couple of our regular recurring orders, some Anchor Fence rail channels and a few Lenderking Metals angle rings.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Kelco Company job. July 6, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. W.R. Grace job. July 6, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Simkins Industries job. July 6, 1993.
The Shop’s job book entry. Lenderking Metal Products job. June 29, 1993.

July 13

I’m very excited on this Tuesday to tune into the Major League Baseball All-Star Game which is being played at Oriole Park. This is the first time since 1958 the Summer Classic has been held in Baltimore and it’s a pretty good game. The only sticking issue with local fans is Orioles’ ace pitcher, Mike Mussina not getting into the game. Toronto Blue Jays manager Cito Gaston who is the skipper of the American League squad becomes a rather unpopular fellow in this City. For me, I love the idea of this beautiful ballpark being showcased around the league. The AL beats the NL 9-3.

1993 MLB All-Star Program.
1993 MLB All-Star Game Program.
1993 MLB All-Star Game Program.
Babe Ruth picture. 1993 MLB All-Star Game Program.
Cal Ripken Jr. 1993 MLB All-Star Game Program.

July 14

It’s Paul Kavanagh’s birthday and he now has to share this day when Victoria Bosse is born. She is born during a thunderstorm and baby and Mom and Dad, Jackie and Richard, are healthy, happy and excited. Mom and Dad now have eleven grandchildren. That makes me an uncle eleven times over as well. 

Vicki Bosse. July 1993.
Handy Brandenburg holding Vicki Bosse, July 1993.

July 23

We are pushing through a few busy weeks in preparation for our annual August vacation. Several extra heavy steel pipes are rolled for Ackerman and Baynes and we begin cranking out another set of aluminum elbows for C.R. Daniels.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Ackerman and Baynes Fabricators job. July 23, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. C.R. Daniels job. August 5, 1993.

August 6

We reach our last Friday before our break and Kavanagh’s and crew are ready for some time away from Central Avenue. Another order of Anchor Fence channels rails is finished and the last of C.R. Daniels 90 degree elbows are picked up. I drive away knowing I have to come by one day next week for the mail but otherwise, I’ll be practicing with the band in hopes of a return to the 8 X 10. Also, I’ll spend as much time as I can with Kim.

Jack Sr. and Betty Kavanagh with Maura, Katie and Rose O”Neill. Summer 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Anchor Fence job. August 4, 1993.

August 20

After our vacation, there is always a glut of work to be dealt with as we pay the price for our time off. After a week or so, things return to normal and today we roll some stainless steel angles for Warren-Ehret and more large flat bars for Codd Fab.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Warren-Ehret Company job. August 20. 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Codd Fabricators job. August 20. 1993.

August 24

Lethal Injection makes its triumphant return to the 8 X 10. We are much better and we play two originals, “Lime Jello N Jam” and “We Only Sell Art.” Both go off really well and we get cheers from the crowd of strangers. Several people even chant “The Wheat, the Wheat” referencing Buck Wheat in “Lime Jello N Jam.” We feel vindicated as we pack up our gear and go. We do not know what’s next for us. We have not figured out how to get real bar gigs yet and that’s a long way from two songs at an open mike show. 

August 30

I am still on cloud nine about our show at the 8 X 10 and I have recounted the performance to any and all who will listen. In particular, I tell Ann and Jack every detail of the night. In the Shop, three more orders for Miscellaneous Metals are rolled then bundled together for pick up.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Miscellaneous Metals job. August 30, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Miscellaneous Metals job. August 30, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Miscellaneous Metals job. August 30, 1993.

September 10

I stand out front of the Shop looking up and down Central Avenue. I’m watching the traffic and taking in the last of the summer weather. Fall is on its way bringing a chill to Baltimore. It feels like the old days here because we have several copper jobs to be bent. Tubes for Stambaugh and for heat exchangers for the Rosewood Center and for Fort Meade are annealed and bent together. Grouping them together helps the time and makes the orders more profitable. We do this whenever possible. The volume of heat exchanger work is down and seems to go down every year. There was a time when we had one or two nearly every week. It’s a sign of the times as many boilers are being modernized. Some use PVC tube instead of copper and some don’t need exchangers at all. Fortunately, old buildings still have old boilers and they will need copper tubes at least for now.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Harvey A. Stambuagh and Sons Company job. September 10, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Rosewood Center job. September 10, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Maryland Procurement- Fort Meade job. September 10, 1993.

September 14

I’m sitting in the upstairs Shop office when I receive a call from Reeve’s Entertainment Systems. It’s Joe Kirk who is working on the television show Homicide and he needs a favor. I have dealt with Joe several times on local productions in the past. An episode is being filmed for next year and they need a circular camera well and they need it fast. Robin Williams is guest starring and he’s only in town for several days. I can get the pipe in a day but I will have to adjust my schedule to fit it in. It won’t really be a big deal and I love doing work for films and TV. I ask Joe if he can do me a favor. I ask to play a dead body on the show. He laughs and tells me everyone wants to be a cadaver so no appearance on television for me but they send us some hats and shirts. We will roll these aluminum pipes tomorrow. The show must go on.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Innoice. Reeve’s Entertaiment job for the TV show Homicide. September 14, 1993.
Homicide hat. One of several sent along with t-shirts from the show to the Joseph Kavanagh Company for services rendered. Photo taken November 2020.

September 23

The breezy cool weather is here and the work remains strong. Some small beams are rolled for Seaford Steel then picked up by Baltimore Galvanizing as they must be hot-dipped in galvanize before installation. A big structural 10” X 2 Tube is filled and rolled for Codd while we prep for jobs for L.J. Brossoit, R & R Fabricators and Perma-Rail. After that, we have another set of channel rails for Anchor Fence.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Seaford Steel job. September 23, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Codd Fabricators job. September 23, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. L.J. Brossoitt and Sons job. September 24, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. R and R Fabrication job. September 24, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Perma Rail Company job. September 24, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Anchor Fence job. September 24, 1993.

September 27

Another order of Belfort Instruments’ square aluminum tubes is cranked out in the Pines. This is a good job but the tolerance is close. There is always a lot of time at the end sizing and tweaking the pieces.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Belfort Instruments job. September 27, 1993.

October 6

As happens every year when October arrives I think of my friend Dave’s birthday. He always throws a righteous party and Lethal Injection are the house band. It will be different this year as Dave has moved from the beloved Belvedere. We had a lot of good times and good parties there but now he has moved to a smaller place on Seidel Avenue. I am a little extra excited because Kim will be there too. I’ll have my band and my girl watching me. I push these thoughts out of my head and grab the phone to call Gary Stambaugh and let him know we have a set of heater tubes ready. As I chat with Gary, I am filling out a delivery ticket for Codd. We have a set of ornamental brass bars ready for pickup.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Harvey A. Stambaugh and Sons job. October 6, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Codd Fabricators job. October 6, 1993.

October 8

The Washington Capitals lose their first game to the New Jersey Devils and Jack is there. He doesn’t mind the long drive to Largo MD and takes his family to as many game as he can. It’s a rough start to the year for Jack’s team as they will go on to lose the first six games of the season.

October 20

I watch as the crew load Miscellaneous Metals’ truck. We had a few trucks picking up material today so that means some billing, always a good thing. As I am about to head up the steps to the office, a man comes through the front door. I stare quizzically at him as he explains he has an idea for a backpack flying machine as he calls it. He has drawings and a rudimentary model of what he’s making. It’s a para-glider with a motorized propeller in a cage to drive it. He needs some tubes bent and rolled for the cage. I ask out of curiosity what he plans to do and he tells me he would like to rent them out at parks for instance Patterson Park. People would pay by the half hour to fly around the park. He’s very sure it will be the next big thing. I am skeptical but make some notes and promise to get him a price. I climb the stairs to the office and tell my brother and sister about it.  

            “I just talked to a guy about bending some aluminum for him.” I take a seat at my desk and both Ann and Jack look up. “He’s building a backpack flying machine and he needs some parts.” Jack and Ann both stare at me curiously.

            I slip into a smile. “He plans on renting them out to people in Patterson to fly around the place for a half an hour.” My brother and sister both grin back at me and laugh a bit.

            “Doesn’t that sound kind of crazy?” Jack asks, his smile mixed with curiosity.

            “I said we’d get him a price. What do I know about it? It might be brilliant besides, who am I to trample on someone’s dreams.” The three of us laugh and I grab a pencil to make some notes about the backpack flying machine. I’ll get him a price and it does, in fact, become a job.

Freedom Flyers rolodex card. 1993.

October 25

It’s a dreary Monday morning at the Shop. The crew enter the building in singles or pairs not looking like they are ready to start the week. I feel the same way. I chat with a few of the guys about the World Series which ended on Saturday. The Toronto Blue Jays repeated as champions this time defeating the Philadelphia Phillies. It was a good series going six games. My Birds had a decent season with 85 wins but that was only good enough for third in the American League East. When 7:30 arrives, it’s up and at ‘em for all of us. We make some samples for Equipment Development Corporation(EDCO) and wrap, package and ship sixty pieces of bent tube for a customer in Florida called Photomart Cine-Video. I don’t know much about them and am curious how they found us. I don’t always know but it’s a nice invoice to send out.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Equipment Development Corporation(EDCO) job. October 25, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Photomart-Cinevideo job. October 25, 1993.

November 1

My friend Dave Muelberger holds his annual birthday/Halloween Party at Seidel Avenue, several doors from the bowling alley on the corner. In the basement, we play some of “the Wall” and our originals, We play “In Dreams” because Dave loves it and we do a lot of the improvised bombastic drones we played at the Belvedere. It’s packed in the cellar but a much smaller house so a much smaller crowd. It’s a good party but it’s not quite the same. The Belvedere had a certain style to it that seems to be lacking on Seidel.

November 3

Ann and I are talking in the office as another week begins. Jack is working on pushing out a heater for the Housing Authority. My sister and I are deep in discussion of Saturday’s party. Ann was there as she has been a few times. She knows Dave and the rest of my gang. It was different but still fun and I was happy to introduce Kim to my friends. Ann had already met her so while we played, Kim was sitting with Ann. As we check the time and realize we should get to work, Ann calls Wilton Corporation and Seaford Steel to let them know their items are ready and I begin double checking the drawings for a sign job for Belsinger Sign Company.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Wilton Corporation job. November 3, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Seaford Steel job. November 3, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Belsinger Sign Company job. November 3, 1993.

November 6

It’s a Saturday and after a day of practice, Tim, Ray and I are having a couple of beers at my house and watching the Riddick Bowe/ Evander Hoylfield fight. None of us are big boxing fans but I  enjoy the heavyweight bouts and since I have HBO, we watch. The fight is a mixed bag but is suddenly stopped in the 7th Round and I see both combatants staring up away from the ring. The camera angle changes and a parachutist seems to have crashed into the ring. He is mobbed by assorted handlers and even hit with a shoe. It’s chaos in the ring and the guys and I are laughing. Just then, the camera shows a propeller in a cage that is attached to the parachutist and then I recognize his face. “Oh my God, I know this guy!” I shout as Tim and Ray look over at me. “We rolled the rings for the cage on that propeller thing. He called it a backpack flying machine.” Tim and Ray seem skeptical for a moment but both know me and start laughing. I laugh too at the insanity of the situation and the bizarre connection to it. Then, I think what if someone sues me or something? Can that happen? I shrug it off but the fight is a fiasco and the “Fan Man” Incident goes down in pugilism history as one of the oddest events ever in a fight.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Freedom Flyers job used in the Fan Man Incident. October 27, 1993.

November 17

Pratt and Central is a busy place as we move toward the end of the year. The holidays are getting close and we always plan on being closed between Christmas and New Year’s. This requires lots of planning and lots of hard work. Today one square bar for R & R and six angles for Price Brothers are rolled while we work on an order of 216 of the standard helicopter seats we bend for Turnbull Enterprises. They are hot for them so they pick up half the order, the right-hands as we call them. The rest will be available by tomorrow afternoon.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. R and R Fabrication job. November 17, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Price Brothers job. November 17, 1993.
The Shop’s job book entry. Turnbull Enterprises job. November 10, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Turnbull Enterprises job. November 17, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Turnbull Enterprises job. November 18, 1993.

November 24

I can almost smell the turkey as tomorrow is Thanksgiving. I will be spending it with Kim and her family. I am nervous but I’ve met her parents and brother a few times. What I don’t know is, there will be no parsnips. They’ve never heard of them and I will have to do without. Before Kavanagh’s and crew leave and prep for our feasts, a few orders from our customers are lingering in the Shop. One by one the trucks come and go until the end of the day and we are done.

Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. McShane, Incorporated job. November 24, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. J.C. Pardo and Sons job. November 24, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. J.C. Pardo and Sons job. November 24, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Codd Fabricators job. November 24, 1993.

December 21

Christmas week is here and it’s a busy one but it’s also a pleasant one. One thing about the few days before Christmas is people are nicer and politer. Most have some holiday greeting for me or best wishes. It’s a hectic week but that seems to be part of the allure of this time of the year. We roll some ladder hoops for Miscellaneous Metals, some stainless steel bars for J.C. Pardo, bend 158 aluminum pipes for F & M Manufacturing and finish several orders for the Whiting-Turner Company. The end of the week will include lunch from Haussner’s for Kavanagh’s and crew including three pounds of their delicious sugar cookies.

The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. December 13, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Miscellaneous Metals job. December 21, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. J.C. Pardo and Sons job. December 21, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. F and M Manufacturing job. December 21, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Whiting-Turner Contracting job. December 21, 1993.
Joseph Kavanagh Company Delivery Ticket. Whiting-Turner Contracting job. December 21, 1993.

December 25

I spend part of Christmas Day at Birch Drive celebrating with the Kavanagh’s but I leave earlier than usual to attend Christmas at Casa Dalfonzo on Woodall Street. The Kavanagh’s are a big crowd with the standard turkey and all the fixings including parsnips. There are children opening packages and adults chatting throughout the day and music with my father as always. When I reach Woodall Street, it’s a smaller group. Kim’s parents Anthony and Linda, her grandmother Dorothy and her brother Paul attend. It’s just as festive to be sure but their family is a lot smaller.  Also, they have never heard of parsnips as I found out at Thanksgiving. I take it upon myself to fix this egregious error in the future. It’s pretty cool spending a holiday with my girl. She’s something special and when I head home, I feel like this was my best Christmas in a very long time. I sit on my couch at Charlesmont Road that night, drinking a beer and playing my guitar with my thoughts on her and how she has affected my life. It has been a year of change for me. My friend John’s death hit his buddies hard and I will think of him often and what could have been. What should have been. To lose a friend in this way then meet someone who would suddenly make all the difference in my life makes no sense. It’s how it played out and I have never been able to make head nor tail out of it. I move forward and know more changes are yet to come for me and eventually at the Shop on Central Avenue.

Joe, Jack and Ann Kavanagh. 6 Kensington Parkway. December 1993.
Joe, Patrick, Ann and Paul Kavanagh. 6 Kensington Parkway. December 1993

Bill Clinton is the President of the United States. The World Trade Center is bombed when a van parked in an underground garage explodes. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms raids the Branch Davidian Compound in Waco, Texas after a 51 day standoff. The PLO and Israel sign a peace agreement. The Savings and Loan Crisis hits the US. The films “Jurassic Park,” “The Fugitive” and “Sleepless in Seattle” are released. Dizzy Gillespie, Thurgood Marshall,  Roy Campanella, Frank Zappa and Marian Anderson die.

To read prior posts, click on the Table of Contents link below:

Table of Contents

1992 Oriole Park at Camden Yards

January 7

It is the start of a new year at the Joseph Kavanagh Company and a big change for me personally. I am buying a house on Charlesmont Road in Dundalk from my sister Jackie and her husband, Richard. Everything is agreed upon and we are settling at the end of next month. The Shop starts the year with a few things on the books including angles for Anderson Industrial Contracting, Ackerman and Baynes and Miscellaneous Metals. Today a 5” steel pipe we rolled for Potomac Iron is picked up and they drop off a large order of 3” angles to add to our schedule. There are enough pieces in the Potomac job to run two machines if necessary. This is a nice spot of work to start things off for us.

The Shop’s job book entry. Anderson Industrial Contracting job. January 8, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Potomac Iron job. January 7, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. January 8, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Ackerman and Baynes job. January 8, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Potomac Iron job. January 13, 1992.

January 18

The Shop is open on a Saturday in January and that’s unusual. We are surprisingly busy enough to put in four hours on the weekend. We bend some aluminum pipes with 4- 90 degree bends for Turnbull Enterprises to make into squares and a few more angles for Miscellaneous Metals and the Warren-Ehret Company. Before we head home, we start on a nice order of channels from Anchor Fence. These channels are bent it two places to make an offset and are used for the tops of railings.

The Shop’s job book entry. Turnbull Enterprises job. January 18, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret Company job. January 18, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. January 17, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. January 23, 1992.

January 26

It is Super Bowl Sunday and the Washington Redskins beat the Buffalo Bills 37-24 to win the NFL Championship. I am not watching but in the garage at LaSalle Avenue practicing with Tim and Ray. We learned a lot after our first year as a trio and we continue to progress as a band. 

Patrick Kavanagh. January 1992.
Paul Kavanagh. 1992.

January 30

January finishes as strong as it started and this week we’ve rolled another 5” pipe for Potomac Iron along with three small orders for J. C. Pardo, a set of angles for Codd Fabricators and we have a coil for Whiting Metals yet to do. A busy January is a good sign for the year.

The Shop’s job book entry. Potomac Iron job. January 29, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. J.C. Pardo job. January 27, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. J.C. Pardo job. January 29, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. J.C. Pardo job. January 27, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job. January 31, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Whiting Metals job. January 31, 1992.

February 3

It’s a cold Monday at the corner of Central and Pratt. We have several jobs for Anchor Fence and Miscellaneous Metals. The Miscellaneous jobs are a wide range of items but all for one project. The Shop also has its usual variety of small orders from Warren-Ehret, Thrifty Iron Works and a few of our other regular customers. 

The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence jobs. January 23, 1992 and February 3, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Misecellaneous Metals jobs. January 23, 1992 and February 7, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. February 11, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Miscelleanous Metals job. February 7, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret Company jobs. February 3, 1992 and February 12, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Thrifty Iron Works job. February 11, 1992.

February 17

As fast as the work can pile up, the phones can also go quiet. We’ve worked our way out of some big orders but we still have a few small jobs. The big ones are nice bills but these little one keep us going. Today we complete jobs for Industrial Fab., Kelco, Anchor Fence, Ackerman and Baynes and two more for Miscellaneous who have been sending work in steady since the start of the year.

The Shop’s job book entry. Industrial Fabricators job. Febaruary 17, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Kelco Company job. February 17, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. February 17, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Ackerman and Baynes job. February 17, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Miscelleaneous Metals job. February 17, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Miscelleaneous Metals job. February 17, 1992.

February 27

I have settled on the house and it is all mine. Next weekend after Jackie, Richard and their daughter Lisa have left, I am moving into the place. I can’t wait,  and my friends will help. It’s a rowhome but behind it is Bear Creek. There is an alley and some parking but then the water. At high tide, it’s a great view but at low tide you can see the tires. I look forward to having more space and no longer being a renter. At the Shop, several orders for Ackerman and Baynes, a single pipe for Anchor and a few 3” angles for Codd Fabricators are rolled and hauled away today.

The Shop’s job book entry. Ackerman and Baynes jobs. February 25, 1992 and February 27, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. February 26, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job. February 25, 1992.

March 7

I move to 7859 Charlesmont Road on this Saturday. It’s a breezy clear day and a small cavalcade of cars follows me with all my possessions. Tim, Ray and my brother-in-law Handy help drive stuff from Bayonne to the new house. After unloading and spreading the boxes into specific rooms, I am officially home. A few minutes later, Harry Bosse,  Jackie’s brother-in-law, pays us a visit and meets Lethal Injection bringing pizza and beer. He is a very popular guy due to the provisions and we soon become good friends.

Joe Kavanagh. Early 1990s.

March 20

My first couple of weeks at the new house have been fun. I began putting things away including turning one bedroom into a guitar room, but I soon abandon any more organization. Boxes become the norm and I don’t have any problem with that. I don’t get many visitors,  though on the weekends, Ray and Tim sometimes come over after practice for a few beers. At the Shop, the crew are working on some bronze flat bars for Lenderking and a pipe job for Turnbull. We get these pipes for Turnbull several times a year. They are 1 1/2” Pipes which are coiled to a circle then trim cut. We make them in aluminum, steel and stainless steel depending on what Turnbull needs. Next up will be a ring for a bell from McShane Bell Foundry, a set of small aluminum angles for Turnbull and another set of forty channel top rails for Anchor Fence.

The Shop’s job book entry. Lenderking Metal Products job. March 20, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Turnbull Enterprises job. March 20, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. McShane Bell Foundry job. March 24, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Turnbull Enterprises job. March 24, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. March 24, 1992.

March 25

A steady rain falls and I join the crew for their two o’clock break. All of us sit quietly and stare out at the rain and the traffic on Central Avenue. So far, this year’s work has been up and down but never outright slow. Excitement is reaching a feverish pitch in the City as the baseball season nears. The new modern/retro Oriole Park at Camden Yards will open next month and tickets are tough to get. Jack has been able to buy three to the third game of the season but opening day or night tickets are long gone. Orioles’ fans are anxious to see the place and start another baseball season,  but even non-fans wait patiently to see how this new stadium will look. My men rise from their chairs and head back to work waking me from my thoughts. I hand off a job card for Codd to Rob Mulllins and one for Industrial Fabricators to Jerry Purnell.

The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job. March 23, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Industrial Fabricators job. March 27, 1992.

April 4

On this Saturday, I have an old C-Band satellite dish installed at my house. It previously belonged to my brother Jack but he can no longer use it due to Community Association rules so he gave it to me. Now I can watch many baseball games, hockey games and other sporting events. I can peak in on camera feeds which are left live for news shows and such. It takes some time to adjust to the variety of channels but I enjoy it. I pay for a few channels but most are free. Sports becomes my dominant viewing choice and watching Cub games from Wrigley Field after I get home from work becomes the norm.

Oriole Park at Camden Yards.

April 6

We close the Shop a few minutes early to give everyone a chance to get home because it is Opening Day. With much pomp and circumstance, Oriole Park at Camden Yards is opened and the Birds welcome the Cleveland Indians. Many former Orioles greats are there and the place is packed. In fact, all of downtown is full of fans who couldn’t get tickets and they watch from bars and restaurants. I watch from Charlesmont Road and cheer as Rick Sutcliffe is masterful as he throws a shut out and the Orioles take this one 2-0. 

Oriole Park at Camden Yards.

April 9

I’m at Oriole Park with Jack and Paul for my first game at the new stadium.  It’s a beautiful park and we have mezzanine seats with an amazing view. My first thoughts as I walk out into the seating bowl is it’s absolutely beautiful. I almost feel as if this is the first baseball game I have ever seen when, in fact, I’ve been to hundreds. Oriole Park has one foot in the future with many modern amenities and another in the past with the exposed brick and the park built to include the old Camden Warehouse. It’s Ebbets Field and Forbes Field but it’s also  made with amazing sight lines and modern video and scoreboards. You can enjoy a hot dog and a beer or a crab cake with a glass of Chardonnay. I think of how we did some of this work. Most of it you can’t see. The angles we rolled were used as molds or forms for the steps and concourses throughout the park. I feel some pride most definitely and then I sit and enjoy the game. It’s time to make some  memories here, Birds. I feel a little bad for Jack who spends an inordinate amount of time taking his boy to the bathroom but we have a good time together. Here we are two brothers at another Birds game and my brother’s son is with us. We also win this game 2-0 just as we did the opener. Jack and I discuss the Shop a bit, going over the work we have and what’s coming in so far. There’s a mix of small jobs for Ackerman and Baynes, Miscellaneous, Turnbull and a few of our other regulars,  but we could use a big order. The Shop works best when we have a mix of one or two large and several dozen small jobs. That generates a backlog and keeps the money flowing into the place.

Baltimore Orioles Ticket. Oriole Park at Camden Yards. April 9, 1992. Game 3 of the season.
The Shop’s job book entry. Ackerman and Baynes job. April 13, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. April 9, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Turnbull Enterprises job. April 10, 1992.

April 25

As was needed, we receive two good-sized orders at the Shop. Miscellaneous Metals and Potomac Iron bring in the weight and we knock it out as quick as we can. When we can focus on one or two jobs for a couple days, the small ones pile up and the schedule fills up.

The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. April 27, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Potomac Iron job. April 27, 1992.

May 1

The Washington Capitals are eliminated from the Stanley Cup playoffs again, this time by the Pittsburgh Penguins in seven games. It’s a tough series and this ouster by the Penguins only increases the bitter rivalry between the clubs. This is definitely true for my brother Jack who admits that this loss stings a little more. We stay busy at the corner of Pratt and Central with one 2” angle for Warren-Ehret and one 6” angle for Miscellaneous Metals rolled today.

The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret Company job. May 1, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. May 1, 1992.

May 7

Lethal Injection decides to cover the entire Pink Floyd the Wall Album. Ray, Tim and I are big Floyd fans and this album is a remarkable piece of work. We begin working on it immediately. Ray is making plans to move from his sister Theresa’s house on LaSalle so the band relocates its practice space to Tim’s basement at 1100 Krueger Avenue. We go song by song divying up the parts as best we can. At work, our regulars such as Kelco, Pardo and Ackerman and Baynes keep the boys busy and we do an oddball job for Miscellaneous Metals. Some half round rods are rolled. They require grooved rollers which we have, but also a flat roller in front. These are rare and a little unpredictable but they work out fine.

The Shop’s job book entry. Kelco Company job. May 5, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. J.C. Pardo job. May 6, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Ackerman and Baynes job. May 7, 1992.
Patrick Kavanagh. 1992.

May 13

It’s Hump Day at 201 S. Central Avenue and both Kavanagh’s and crew are dragging a little. It happens in the middle of the week. Ann, Jack and I go over the schedule for the next week. When busy, we try to adhere to a rigid order of jobs. We want them done in the same order they come into the building when at all possible. A mixed bag of small jobs for Chesapeake Machine, Novatec, Warren-Ehret and Whiting Metals are sent out today with a bigger order from Whiting on the horizon. I receive a call from Miscellaneous Metals as well,  promising more work coming up.

The Shop’s job book entry. Chesapeake Machine job. May 13, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Novatec job. May 13, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret Company job. May 11, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Whiting Metals job. May 13, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Whiting Meals job. May 22, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. May 19, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. May 19, 1992.

May 27

I sit at my desk reading the Baltimore Sun when the phone rings and it’s Joe Kelly from Kelco. He’s checking on an order for some 5” pipes. I tell him to come on down as we just took the last one out of the machine. When I hang up, I call Richard Baynes at Ackerman and Baynes to arrange pick up of some beams. Ann hands me several faxes, one from Chesapeake Machine for aluminum pipes to be bent, and another set of forty channel rail tops for Anchor Fence are coming in. Those channel rail tops are becoming a pretty regular thing for us and I love those kind of jobs. Recurring jobs are things you can count on and we need all of those we can get.

The Shop’s job book entry. Kelco Company job May 27, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Ackerman and Baynes job. May 27, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Chesapeake Machine job. June 1, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. June 2, 1992.

June 17

I turn 27 very quietly. I jam with Tim and Ray at Krueger Avenue for a couple of hours then head home to Charlesmont. I have a couple beers while watching the Birds take on the Indians in Cleveland. We out hit them thirteen to five but lose the game 3-2. It’s a puzzler but that’s baseball. As I prepare for bed, my thoughts are on the Shop. We have maintained a good backlog since mid-March. I go through the schedule in my head. We have some angles for our best customer, Codd Fabricators, some big structural channels for Miscellaneous Metals and angle rings for Lenderking.

The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators jobs. June 17, 1992 and June 22, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. June 30, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Lenderking Metal Products jobs. June 25, 1992 and June 30, 1992.

June 26

Jack and my father pick me up from my home and we are heading to the Orioles game. Bob Yingling, our sales rep for C-S Metals and a long-time friend, has some tickets from C-S and he’s treating us. Dad and Mom drove up today and will spend the weekend in Baltimore. This is Dad’s first game at the new ballpark and he’s very excited,  as is Bob. Bob thinks the world of my Dad and it’s a thrill for him to be there for Dad’s first Oriole Park experience. We meet Bob at the Camden Club which is a swanky restaurant in the Warehouse adjacent to the field. Dad is impressed when he walks in and we’re all glad we dressed up a bit. Bob shows us around as best he can then we take a table and place our order. Dad heads off to the men’s room while Bob, Jack and I talk about the Birds. When my father returns, Bob ducks away to make a phone call and Dad leans forward to speak to Jack and me.

            “Hey boys. You gotta go to the bathroom and take a look.” Jack and I exchange bewildered glances. “I’m serious. You gotta go and look out the window in there. You can see batting practice and the field.”

            Jack and I chuckle a little. “From the bathroom? Are you serious?” I ask grinning at my father.

            “Yes, I mean it. It’s a great view. I mean I don’t know why they put it in the men’s room but it’s a great view of the field. Maybe they expect the lines to be long.” He shrugs then sits back in his seat.

            Jack turns to face him. “Is there some reason you waited for Bob to leave the table before telling us this?”

            Dad slyly grins at Jack then me. “Well, I didn’t want him to think we were weird or something.”

            “He knows us, Dad.” I return the grin.

            “It’s too late.” Jack adds and the three of us break into laughter. Fortunately, we recover before Bob returns. After our meal of crab cakes, we take our seats and my father is silent as he takes it all in. He looks out toward left field then slowly moves his view to the right as if memorizing the place. It truly is a beautiful place to see a game. He then begins telling Bob how we did so much work for the ballpark, the seating bowl in particular and how our angles were used as concrete forms for the place we are standing. The Shop had rolled these concrete form angles for theaters and smaller places in my father’s time but nothing like this. Dad becomes a bit animated as he regales Bob on the job and my eyes meet Jack’s. Dad is by no means taking credit as he gives us and Ann our due, deferring to us both once or twice for details. We can tell he’s proud of us so we listen and smile. Jack and I are in silent agreement. Dad can tell it better than we can anyway. For a few minutes, I feel like he’s back in that small office talking Shop again. We see a great game with the Orioles beating the Royals 6-5. We’re on the road before the ninth inning as these games run late for my father but by the time he and Jack are dropping me off, the game is done and we won.

Baltimore Orioles Ticket. Oriole Park at Camden Yards. June 26,1992.

July 2

A very busy and hot Thursday is spent on some tubes and channels for Kelco and a small set of angles for Lenderking. We are closed tomorrow with Independence Day being on a Saturday so there is extra motivation to get these finished before the long weekend.

The Shop’s job book entry. Kelco Company job. July 2, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Kelco Company job. July 2, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Lenderking Metal Products job. July 2, 1992.
Joe, Paul and Patrick Kavanagh. 7859 Charlesmont Road. Backyard. July 1992.
Jack Jr. and Paul Kavanagh. 7859 Charlesmont Road. July 1992.
Joe and Patrick Kavanagh. Bear Creek behind 7859 Charlesmont Road. July 1992.
Paul and Patrick Kavanagh. 7859 Charlesmont Road. Paul’s 5th Birthday Party. July 1992.
Paul and Ann Kavanagh. 7859 Charlesmont Road. July 1992.

July 22

As we approach our annual summer vacation next month, more work for Miscellaneous Metals is attended to in the R-3-S. These are flat bars rolled into U’s for ladder hoops. The ladder hoops are placed on fire escapes and ladders as a protective band to help keep the climber safe as they go from spoke to spoke. The bands are placed behind the climber to keep them from falling.

The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. July 22, 1992.

August 7

The last Friday before our vacation is here and everyone breathes a sigh of relief. The last rush of work is picked up and trucked away from the corner of Pratt and Central. The last bit are some more big  channels for Miscellaneous. They have been a very surprising boost to our year and I make note of it in my head as I drive off for a week’s respite.

The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. August 6, 1992.
Jack Sr.. Betty, Jack Jr., Nancy, Paul and Patrick Kavanagh. 1992.
Patrick Kavanagh. Ocean City, MD. August 1992.

August 15

After a week of vacation and practice, we premier the Wall at a party at the Belvedere and our friend Dave Muelberger loves it, joining in on guitar where he can. It’s a party but a tame affair compared to  Dave’s birthday parties around Halloween. He promises us this year’s party will be particularly big as the 31st falls on a Saturday.

Paul and Patrick Kavanagh. 1992.

August 25

Our second week back to work and we are swamped. Yesterday two orders for Gischel were completed, a flat bar was rolled and tack welded and a pipe curved into a ring. Today we finish a heat exchanger for the Housing Authority and begin a couple jobs for Miscellaneous Metals and a big bent bar order for Turnbull. The family receives some exciting news when my sister JoAnn in Florida lets everyone know she is pregnant. JoAnn and husband Carl Panetti will welcome a baby in January.

Carl and JoAnn Panetti. Florida. 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Housing Authority of Baltimore City job. August 24, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. August 26, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. August 26, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Turnbull Enterprises job. August 24, 1992.

September 8

Miscellaneous Metals needs some more 2” angles rolled and to save time they have us furnish the material. We keep a few in stock and I make a mental note to call Seaboard Steel tomorrow and order some replacements. I’ll talk to Linda Dalfonzo who is my sales rep. She’s very nice and down-to-earth on the phone. Linda is one of the least “salesy” salespersons I’ve known and I like that about her. In addition, we have a Housing Authority heater to retube tomorrow.

The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. September 8, 1992.

September 15

It’s mid September and the Orioles aren’t out of it yet. The Toronto Blue Jays and the Birds have battled most of the season for first but my Orioles are running out of time. I fold the newspaper up at my desk then head out to the Shop. We have three sets of angle rings for Lenderking Metal Products to finish by noon and another order for Miscellaneous Metals. Their work seems to have no end in sight. This one is for bars rolled into tight half-circles. When we are done with those, we have four pipes for Warren-Ehret to curve. 

The Shop’s job book entry. Lenderking Metal Products jobs. September 15, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. September 15, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret Company job. September 15, 1992.

October 9

It’s the Washington Capitals home opener and my brother is there. He is ready to start the next campaign,  always positive that this will be a good one. Unfortunately, the Caps lose to the New York Rangers 4-2.

Jack Jr., Paul and Patrick Kavanagh with Handy Brandenburg in background. 6 Kensington Parkway. 1992.

October 15

The Shop rolls on with several small orders for Anchor Fence and two large orders of stainless pipes for Whiting Metals. These must be filled and rolled so a lot of torch work is required. It’s a smokey hot few days but a good invoice to send out when completed.

The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. October 15, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. October 15, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Whiting Metals job. October 15, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Whiting Metalas job. October 15, 1992.

October 17

Lethal Injection holds another Friends and Family Concert and this time we have some other bands on the bill. Our former lead singer Chris Voxakis has teamed with our buddy Dave to form CoIntel Pro and they play a set along with Tim’s cousin’s band, Suite 16. It’s a festival show and thankfully the weather is sunny and cool. For our bit, we play a few more originals then before and a longer chunk of the The Wall. Madge and Barry Heaps throw a good party and there is plenty to eat, drink and lots of music to hear.

October 24

For the first time in World Series history a team from outside the US wins when the Toronto Blue Jays defeat the Atlanta Braves in six games. My Orioles settled for third place with 89 wins. I watch the end of this game in Tim’s basement after a Saturday of practice. We are prepping for a very big party at the Belvedere next week.

October 31

Halloween and Dave’s Birthday are today and the Lethal Boys, as Dave calls us, are the house band at the Belvedere. We start off by playing our three man plus Dave version of the Wall. When we cover the Wall, it’s a very tight set. Our timing has to be very close. When we finish, the pressure is off and we can jam it out as we see fit. I do my best snake guitar impression on a hyped up version of Brian Eno’s “Baby’s on Fire” then we dedicate another of Eno’s songs “Blank Frank” to friend Frank Czawlytko. The room is a mass of people bobbing, dancing and more often staggering about us. Finally, we finish with the classic “Sweet Jane” with Dave singing lead vocals. One of Dave’s roommates is named Gabe and he and Dave are not getting along. Dave assumes he may be planning on running out on the rent. I am always the troublemaker and on the first pass of the chorus, I substitute Gabe for Jane during my backing vocals. Dave loves it and screams a cackle of laughter and the song now becomes “Sweet Gabe.” Tempers flair and Dave and Gabe are now arguing as Tim, Ray and I are packing up our equipment. Gabe breaks Dave’s pinball machine and Dave hurls Gabe’s coffee table through the front bay window onto the lawn. Glass flies everywhere and neighbors and party goers appear from every corner. Dave and Gabe don’t come to blows but are in a very loud shouting match now. Lethal Injection kicks its exit into high gear and we hasten out the door with the last of our gear as the first police arrive. The officer approaches me as we slide amps into Tim’s car. I tell him we don’t live here. We are just a band playing a party and our set was over when the glass broke. Chaos spreads around us as folks quickly volunteer to tell the officer what happened. Next thing I know, he’s having his partner back up his patrol car so we can pull away and drive off. I glance into the rear view mirror to see Dave calmly explaining to the officer what happened as Gabe speaks to another cop and a growing mob gathers around them. I hear Ray’s soft voice in the back seat as we pull away, “Now, THAT was a party.”

November 3

I vote in Dundalk for the first time and again I write myself in for President. I found little appeal in either candidate. I have strong doubts about the practicality of the two party system and I can never be blamed for voting for a bad president unless I win. Democrat Bill Clinton takes the Presidency of the United States over incumbent Republican George H.W. Bush, Independent Candidate Ross Perot and myself. Meanwhile at the Shop, an angle order for Codd is finished on Monday and another will be rolled tomorrow.

The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job. November 2, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job. November 4, 1992.

November 4

At work today, we get some sad news. My Uncle Ed’s wife, Lillian has died. Ed retired from the Shop about four years ago and he stops in occasionally to see us. Aunt Lillian passed suddenly and the family gathers in love and support. My parents drive up from Ocean City. Ed and his daughter Patsy are shocked but handle it well and the rest of the Kavanagh’s do their best to be there for them. 

Ed and Lillian Kavanagh. Wedding picture.
Lillian Fetch Kavanagh and Howard Fetch(cousin). 1980s.
Ed Kavanagh. 1970s.

November 9

In addition to a nice load of work, the Shop suddenly has a huge heat exchanger to replace for the Housing Authority. This unit has over three hundred tubes to bend in it and the assembly will be a tough process as well. Each tube must be carefully placed into holes in a tube sheet or header and accuracy matters. The holes won’t be perfect so some will slip in and some will need to be lightly tapped in. If it’s for Big Mike at the Housing Authority, it’s a rush so we need to get this finished as fast as possible. Jack and I jump on this job ourselves to start it off. I anneal and he bends until we get the first few sets ready than I pass off the torch to one of the crew. For Jack and me, it’s like old times.

The Shop’s job book entry. Housing Authority of Baltimore City job page 1. November 9, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Housing Authority of Baltimore City job page 2. November 9, 1992.

November 11

It’s a cold chilly day but the boys work through it bending some boiler parts, a steel pipe railing and thirty-one pipes for Anchor Fence. We’ve done a lot of the channel work for them this year but these pipes for bridges are one of our staples. Bridges have a barrier between the edge and pedestrians or drivers. It’s usually barbed wire stretched from a few bent pipes such as these. Anchor and Miscellaneous have really made the difference in our success this year.

The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. November 11, 1992.

November 30

Another big project in Frederick has brought us another very large order from Miscellaneous Metals who are becoming one of my favorite customers. They pick up over 100 rolled 5” angles and I hope things keep rolling for them. 

The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. November 30, 1992.
Paul and Patrick Kavanagh. 1992.

December 7

December arrives and we have a heater for the Housing Authority, angles for Ackerman and Baynes and Potomac Iron and small channels for G-S to finish. We are also beginning work on some aluminum pipes for Turnbull and an order of galvanized pipes for COVCO. 

The Shop’s job book entry. Housing Authority of Baltimore City job. December 7, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Ackerman and Baynes job. December 7, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Potomac Iron job. December 9, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. G-S Company job. December 7, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Turnbull Enterprises job. December 9, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. COVCO job. December 9, 1992.
Jack Jr., Nancy, Paul and Patrick Kavanagh. 1992.

December 22

The mad scramble at the end of the year finishes with orders for Miscellaneous, Kelco, Thrifty Iron and Gischel Machine. I make a few calls to customers and vendors including Seaboard Steel. I need a price but I also want to wish Linda a Merry Christmas. The receptionist who answers the phone is really sweet and it turns out she is Linda’s daughter Kim. For some reason, there’s something about Kim’s voice that sticks in my head. Finally, it’s four o’clock and the year which started great, then got a little erratic, has ended well and we are ready for some time away from this place.

The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. December 15, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. December 22, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Kelco Company job. December 11, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Kelco Company job. December 10, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Thrifty Iron Works job. December 10, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Gischel Machine job. December 16, 1992.
The Shop’s job book entry. Gischel Machine job. December 16, 1992.
JoAnn Kavanagh Panetti. Florida. 1992.

December 25

Christmas Day is spent on Birch Drive at my sister Nancy’s house. My parents drive up for a couple days then they will spend some time in Florida next month waiting for the new baby. Much of the talk is about the new one on the way and this excitement is doubled when Jackie and her husband Richard announce they are expecting too. So grandchild number 10 will arrive in January and number 11 in July. This raises the level of excitement. A long distance call is made to JoAnn and the phone is passed around as we all congratulate her and Jackie as well. It’s the usual Kavanagh holiday with turkey and all the trimmings including parsnips as well as roasted beef and an endless array of sweets, cookies and desserts. When my father sits at the piano, the music begins. Some remain in their seats and chat quietly while others gather around my father and join their voices with his. That’s how it is for the Kavanagh’s at Christmas. When the party starts breaking down, I bid my farewells and drive across the beltway to Dundalk. I settle onto the couch with a beer. The house seems very large and empty after the holiday party. It’s quiet but for my movements. I pick up my guitar just as much to end the silence as to play. It’s been a strange year. I work a lot and I play a lot with my buddies in the band. There are a lot of parties and a great deal of fun but I’m also growing up more. I’m a homeowner now. I moved to fancier new digs like my Orioles did. I guess change is good or usually it is. I hope our new homes bode well for myself and the Birds. Things are going well but I feel certain my life is missing something.

Patrick Kavanagh with Jack Kavanagh Sr. and Joseph Szakacs. Christmas 1992.
Paul and Patrick Kavanagh. Christmas 1992.

George H.W. Bush finishes his term as President of the United States but loses re-election to Bill Clinton. President Bush signs the North American Free Trade Agreement. Mafia Boss John Gotti is sentenced to life in prison. The largest mall in America is built in Minnesota. Nicotine Patches are invented. The Cartoon Network premiers. The films “Bram Stoker’s Dracula,” “Glengary Glenn Ross,” and “A League of Their Own” are released. Marlene Dietrich,  Alex Haley, Isaac Asimov, Sam Kinison,   and Cleavon Little die.

There are 50 states in the Union.

Oriole Park at Camden Yards.

To read prior posts, click on the Table of Contents link below:

Table of Contents

1991 A Fond Farewell

January 2

The Shop starts another year at 201 S. Central Avenue. My sister, brother and I have a crew of six men. A far cry from the thirty employed here in the 1910’s but a long way from where Old Uncle Joe started with just himself and a book keeper partner in 1866. We are the great-grandchildren of his nephew Joseph A. Kavanagh. Work and family are intertwined in this place and it’s always been that way. To begin this winter, we have another angle to roll for Codd Fab. We’ve been rolling angles for the seating bowl of the new ballpark for them and this is for the same project but a structural lintel. The stadium is moving along and now is the time for finishing sections and final steel elements.  Also a big tube job for Miscellaneous Metals that hung over from last year is picked up. Every member of the crew has time loading the truck. There’s no way to bundle these so they are humped onto the truck by hand but it gets done. When I’m not working, I’m in the garage at LaSalle with the rest of my band Lethal Injection. We are a trio now and we are excited for the challenge. I begin to use the Moog Bass Pedals and we purchase a set of Midi pedals which Tim uses. Simpler bass parts are picked up with the pedals and the more complex are split between Tim and I or dropped. Ray plays some more melodic parts on the electronic part of his kit. Everyone is miked so all can sing and it seems more than workable.

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The Shop’s job book entry. OPACY job for Codd Fabricators. January 3, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. January 3, 1991.

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Paul Kavanagh. Christmas 1990.

January 16

A sunny comfortable 50 degree January day is enjoyed in Baltimore and the crew open the doors up to feel the warmth of the sun. Usually, this old building is an icebox in the winter and we keep doors and windows closed to keep what heat we have in the place. The boys are spread over a handful of jobs. A set of small flat bar rings is finished in the R-3-S for Stromberg Sheet Metal then a 1” Pipe is coiled for Turnbull in the same machine. The R-5-S is equally busy with 2- 4” Aluminum channels for Chesapeake Machine and one 2” Pipe for Whiting Metals being curved.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Turnbull Enterprises job. January 15, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Stromberg Sheet Metal Works job. January 16, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Chesapeake Machine job. January 16. 1991.

January 17

Operation Desert Storm begins when the US and allies attack Iraq in response to its invasion of Kuwait. I find out while hanging in Tim’s basement, talking to Ray, Tim and his Dad. The US led coalition starts with air attacks and in three weeks, a ground invasion will begin.

January 27

The New York Giants defeat the Buffalo Bills 20-19 to win the Super Bowl. It is a rare close one but I ignore the game completely as I am practicing with the band. My Mom and Dad have taken a winter’s vacation to Florida to visit my sister JoAnn and do some fishing. They find they love Florida and think of spending some time away from the cold of Maryland winters each year.

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Jack Kavanagh St. with a King Mackerel. Forida Keys. Winter 1991.

February 12

Several 1” OD Aluminum tubes are rolled then trimmed for C. R. Daniels. We did fifteen in January and now 20 more. We have four different versions of this item we do for CR and we keep the fixtures for trimming on hand. Two 7” Beams are rolled into 5 ft. 6” diameter half-circles for Chesapeake Machine and forty-two 3” Square tube 180 deg bends are finished for Miscellaneous Metals. We lost out on this job big time. It’s the holding tangents/straights on each end. It slows the job up and makes matching each piece tricky. We have stayed steady if not busy so far this winter. Next up, we have thirty-six lengths of pipe to roll for Bengies Welding to eight different radii. Jerry Purnell starts the job then passes it off to one of the younger mechanics.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Two C.R. Daniels jobs. January 22 , 1991 and February 11, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Chesapeake Machine job. February 12, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. February 11, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Bengies Welding job. February 15, 1991.

February 25

Another group of fourteen angles for concrete forms for the new ballpark are picked up by Codd Fabricators. This job made last year successful for us and it’s helping us this year. The overall work is down a bit but that’s bound to happen after an unusually up year. I still get a thrill to think these pieces will be used in the new ballpark. I look forward to going there. The renderings of the park look beautiful and bit by bit, it’s beginning to look like those pictures.

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The Shop’s job book entry. OPACY job for Codd Fabricators. February 25, 1991.

February 27

The Gulf War ends after Iraq agrees to withdraw from Kuwait. By early March, American troops will begin leaving the Persian Gulf. At the Shop, Three hundred 1” stainless steel pipes are bent for Turnbull Enterprises. These pipes are used for the bases for chairs in Navy helicopters and we’ve received this order several times in the last couple of years. It looks to be a recurring thing with some luck. The pieces need two bends on a tight radius. We build a special die for the job. Using an existing bending die we add on some bars to simply things. The first bend is easy but the second, not so much. The bend is in the vertical plane compared to the first bend and being square and straight is critical. The extra bars allow us to check the piece for straightness before bending the pipe. There are left and rights of these so half of the pipes are bent with the first bend pointing down and half with it pointing up. Again, the attachments to the die, make things smoother and quicker.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Turnbull Enterprises job. February 27, 1991.

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Special built up bending die for Turnbull Enterprises 1″ Pipe job. Photo taken August 2020.

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Special built up bending die for Turnbull Enterprises 1″ Pipe job. Photo taken August 2020.

March 20

A big order of rolled 3” pipes, eighty-three 20 foot lengths, is picked up today and it’s a good bill to send out. It’s a big load and Jack and I both help to get them on the truck. When I get back to my desk, I write up two job cards, one for flat bars for Bengies Welding and another order of angles for the stadium for Codd. It’s just a small set of eight as the forms, steps and concourses are being made and the ballpark is getting closer to being a reality.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Miscellaneous Metals job. March 20, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Bengies Welding job. March 21, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. OPACY job for Codd Fabricators, March 21, 1991.

April 4

A nice order of stainless steel flat bars is picked up by Warren-Ehret while another group of larger stainless bars for Chesapeake Machine is rolled in the old R-5. Meanwhile, our most experienced mechanic, Jerry Purnell, sets up the R-2 for some short 1” Square aluminum tubes for Belsinger Sign Works.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret job. April 3, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Chesapeake Machine job. April 4, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Belsinger Sign Works job. April 5, 1991.

April 7

The Baltimore Orioles open up at home on this Monday and it’s a regrettable start. The Birds are beaten 9-1 by the Chicago White Sox who combined Jack MacDowell’s complete game start with two home runs by Sammy Sosa to put this game away early. It’s still a good day in Baltimore as any opening day is. In spring, hope is eternal but those hopes will disappear quickly for the Orioles and their fans. This will be a tough year on the field and an emotional one in the stands. This is the final year for venerable old Memorial Stadium and the Birds will relocate downtown to the new Oriole Park at Camden Yards next season.

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Memorial Stadium. Page from 1991 Baltimore Orioles Program.

April 25

The Washington Capitals lose in the second round of the Stanley Cup Playoffs to the Pittsburgh Penguins. The Caps had beaten the New York Rangers in round one but fall to a team that is becoming a bitter rival to Washington hockey fans. Jack is disappointed but not overly so. He’s an optimist and decides to root as hard as he can for the Penguins to not win the Cup. Sadly, he’ll be disappointed again as the Penguins will take the NHL Championship this year.

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Paul Kavanagh. April 1991.

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Patrick Kavanagh. April 1991.

April 15

It’s Tax Day in America and that’s no holiday so we are laboring at the corner of Pratt and Central. Two jobs for Warren-Ehret are picked up. We also finished another couple of angles for the stadium for Codd several days ago and the steel phase of the stadium construction is down to some small details.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret job. April 15, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret job. April 15, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. OPACY job for Codd Fabricators. April April 11, 1991.

May 2

A cool spring day is spent curving some Anchor Fence channels. We get these pretty regularly, and a set of stainless steel angles are completed for Kelco. Ann, Jack and I have decided to do some renovating in the building. Specifically, we are going to add a new office. We will build a small second story in a section of the front of the Shop. We’ll lay a platform out and build on it. The Kavanagh’s and crew will handle all of it and the old office will become a break room for the workers. Air conditioning in the summer and heat in the winter, the men will not know what to do. Jack quickly begins making plans and sketches of this build. This type of thing is right up Jack’s alley and he’s excited to start.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Two jobs for Anchor Fence. April 23, 1991 and May 2, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Kelco Company job. May 2, 1991.

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Patrick Kavanagh. Ocean City, MD. May 12, 1991.

May 23

Oriole Legend Frank Robinson is fired and Johnny Oates is hired as manager. The team is off to an atrocious 13-24 start. It will be a nostalgic farewell of a summer on 33rd Street but not a successful one on the field. At Pratt and Central, some bent pipes are picked up by Bengies Welding and two angles by  the Fingles Company. Jack has two of the crew with him and work is moving forward on the upstairs  office. The platform is placed and next we will lay a wood floor and frame the room out. I am on the phone most of the day in the “old” office. I get orders from A. J. Sackett, D-S Pipe and Kelco. All will be sending material in tomorrow. No big jobs but the bread and butter of what we do. Two or three pieces is our standard size order. The big ones are great but many little ones keep this place rolling.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Bengies Welding job. May 22, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Fingles Company job. May 23, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. A.J. Sackett and Sons Company job. May 30, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. A.J. Sackett and Sons Company job. May 30, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. D-S Pipe job. May 31, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Kelco Company job. May 31, 1991.

June 5

A large order of twenty-six 4” angles is finished in the R-6-S and I call Joe Lewis from Industrial Fabricators to tell him. Joe is one of the elder statesman of the industry and he is often rather chatty too.  I don’t mind. The man is a fount of information and knowledge about the metals game. I do enjoy doing work for this company because I am either dealing with Joe or his right-hand man, Frank Schmidt. I have known Frank since I first came to work twelve years ago. He’s a good guy, easygoing and also very smart about the metal fabrication industry.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Industrial Fabricators job. June 5, 1991.

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Paul Kavanagh. Backyard of 6 Kensington Parkway. Summer 1991.

June 26

A standard order of bent, threaded and trimmed galvanized pipes for COVCO and a repeat job of 6” steel channels for Kelco Company are cranked out today. We rolled two channels for Kelco thee weeks ago and two more today. The new office is nearly complete. Jack has worked hard on this thing and got it built quick. There are a few little final touches then next week, we will move in officially.

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The Shop’s job book entry. COVCO job. June 25, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Two Kelco Company job. June 5, 1991 and June 26, 1991.

July 1

Monday starts a new week albeit a short holiday one and I find myself in our new office. It’s much bigger. There is some space between Ann, Jack and I and the crew have their own break room now. It’s a win win and the place looks great. It feels modern which is odd for this place. Our workers came in Saturday for a half-day in exchange for the Shop being closed on Friday. It will be a four day Independence Day weekend but a busy three days to get there. Several jobs must be completed by Wednesday and picked up. Two different railing jobs, six channels for Anchor Fence and twenty-two small aluminum rods for Belsinger Sign. Belsinger’s pieces are small, short and light. A serious gravy job we would call it and I am sure we’ll get everything finished but it will be down to the wire on Wednesday.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. July 3, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Belsinger Sign Works job. July 3, 1991.

July 9

It’s hot on Central Avenue as we anneal and bend some aluminum pipe 90 degree elbows for Belfort Instruments. Aluminum annealing is hot and grueling in the summer but what’s worse is we are annealing and bending some copper as well. Two 1 1/4” O.D. copper heat exchangers for the Housing Authority are bent and assembled. We get less and less of these as the units are being replaced with modern PVC. It’s a sign of the times and nothing to be done about it but be glad some heaters are sill in the old style. Besides Belfort’s tubes and the heaters, a couple small steel tubes are rolled for Kelco.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Belfort Instruments job. July 9, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Housing Authority of Baltimiore City job. July 9, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Housing Authority of Baltimore City job. July 10, 1991.

July 13

Lethal Injection holds its second Friends and Family Concert at Krueger Avenue. The Heaps host and love a party. No big “Lethal Injection” cake this time but a few different desserts to follow the standard burger and hot dog Baltimore cookout. This is our first performance as a trio and I’m particularly nervous because I am singing more. Tim borrows some tents from the Baltimore Cemetery so we are not standing in the sun. We play RUSH and Pink Floyd tunes as we usually do along with a few other covers such as “In Dreams” by Roy Orbison. We include several originals, an improvisational spoken word version of “The Beat” and finish with a tip of the cap to the film “Dr. Strangelove” by playing “We’ll Meet Again.” The show goes well and most of my nerves go away after a few minutes. My parents are there and this is their first time seeing me play with the band. It’s not really their kind of music but they have fun. They do know “We’ll Meet Again” and other than telling me to “pep it up” a bit, Dad says he enjoyed that one. My father is the consummate swing fan so he wants everything pepped up.

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Joe Kavanagh. Lethal Injection Friends & Family Concert. Backyard of 1100 Krueger Avenue. July 13, 1991.

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Joe Kavanagh and Ray French. Lethal Injection Friends & Family Concert. Backyard of 1100 Krueger Avenue. July 13, 1991.

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Tim Heaps. Lethal Injection Friends & Family Concert. Backyard of 1100 Krueger Avenue. July 13, 1991.

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Ray French. Lethal Injection Friends & Family Concert. Backyard of 1100 Krueger Avenue. July 13, 1991.

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Ray French. Lethal Injection Friends & Family Concert. Backyard of 1100 Krueger Avenue. July 13, 1991.

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Ray French. Lethal Injection Friends & Family Concert. Backyard of 1100 Krueger Avenue. July 13, 1991.

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Paul Kavanagh. Fourth Birthday Party. July 13, 1991.

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Patrick Kavanagh. July 1991.

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Paul Kavanagh. Fourth Birthday Party. July 13, 1991.

July 18

Some channel rail tops are rolled for Anchor Fence and another small angle order for the stadium is begun for Codd Fab. We receive two orders for heat exchangers for the Housing Authority. Though the number of heaters we do has dropped, the summer is often when they are fixed. Heat is not needed so maintenance units can be taken out of service and the repairs completed with no inconvenience.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. July 18, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. OPACY job for Codd Fabricators. July 19, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Housing Authority of Baltimore City job. July 22, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Housing Authority of Baltimore City job. July 24, 1991.

July 29

We are getting closer to our week’s vacation and everyone is anxious. The crew work hard in the heat to get as much done each day. Today, a dozen more big angles are rolled for Codd Fabricators in the R-6-S and some small parts for Belsinger Sign Works are rolled in the R-2. The angles are more finishing parts for the new ballpark and Belsinger makes commercial signs all over the Maryland area.

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The Shop’s job book entry. OPACY job for Codd Fabricators. July 29, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Belsinger Sign Works job. July 29, 1991.

August 1

Two custom channel bends for Anchor Fence are curved to match a template and another 1 1/4” O.D. copper heat exchanger is in the works for the City. Both must be completed and in the customers’ hands by tomorrow then it will be vacation time.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. August 1, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Housing Authority of Baltimore City job. August 2, 1991.

August 5

The Joseph Kavanagh Company enjoys a week of rest and quiet. The Shop is closed though I will stop in one day to pick up the mail and check for answering machine messages. I do this each year mostly because I live the closest being still in Baltimore City on Bayonne Avenue.  I look forward to getting to the garage earlier each day and playing as much as we can. After our show last month, we are feeling very upbeat about our little trio. I felt things went well and we are getting better as a group and finally able to stretch out with songs both originals and covers.

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Paul Kavanagh. Frontier Town, Ocean City, MD. August 1991.

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Patrick Kavanagh. Frontier Town, Ocean City, MD. August 1991.

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Paul Kavanagh. Ocean City, MD. August 1991.

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Patrick Kavanagh. Ocean City, MD. August 1991.

August 19

We are back to work and busy with the usual variety of railings, angle flanges and lintels, pipe rings and a set of aluminum parts for C. R. Daniels. Vacation was fun. I played and I got some rest but as always, it wasn’t long enough. Everyone is dragging a little on this first day back but I can’t blame them. Time off from work is good but it can spoil you too.

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The Shop’s job book entry. C.R. Daniels job. August 19, 1991.

August 29

It’s been a very hot end to August at the corner of Pratt and Central. Several days of torch work have come along with orders from Bengies and Belfort Instruments. One of Belfort’s jobs consists of bent aluminum square tubes. These are bent in the Pines Bender and a square mandrel needs to be made for it. The pieces are tricky with two-bends and a tight tolerance. There is a lot of sizing at the end with this one. The boys are glad to see all this aluminum leave the building and hope for some cool steel for the rest of the summer.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Bengies Welding job. August 29, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Belfort Iinstruments job. August 29, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Belfort Instruments job. August 29, 1991.

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Square bending die and square mandrell for Belfort Instruments job. Photo taken August 2020.

September 13

The work has stayed steady and the last few days have been angle focused with orders for Codd and Ackerman and Baynes being passed through the Six while we bang out a few channel tops for Anchor Fence. We have some more angles for the stadium for Codd and they will be the last of the ballpark work. Another big set of decorative aluminum angles for Ackerman and Baynes has been dropped off to roll next week.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job. September 11, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job. September 12, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Ackerman and Baynes job. September 13, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Two Anchor Fence job. July 11, 1991 and September 13, 1991.

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Patrick Kavanagh. September 1991.

October 4

The Washington Capitals begin their season tonight against the Philadelphia Flyers and win 5-2. Jack is there and I’m at my own sporting event. I attend the Orioles and Tigers game at Memorial Stadium. This is the last weekend of the season and the last chance to see the old ballpark. A rookie starter who was called up late in the season, Mike Mussina gets the nod. I watch the game but mostly my thoughts are on past games. MANY past games that my family and I were at since I was a small boy. I went to my first World Series game here when I was one. I saw so many games and great players over those years. It all comes back to me. I even wander around in the back of the stadium to take it all in once more. It’s a nostalgic night and a bittersweet one. Glenn Davis hits the last Oriole home run I ever saw at Memorial Stadium. The Birds will lose in 14 innings but I am long gone by then. Friday was a work day and the reminiscing tires me out.

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1991 Baltimore Orioles Souvenir Program.

October 6

The Baltimore Orioles lose 7-1 to the Detroit Tigers but most of Baltimore doesn’t care about the outcome. The Birds are at the bottom of the standings and this game is more about memories of the past and a new hope for the future. Many old Orioles attend including my hero, Brooks Robinson. When the last out is recorded, that’s that. The thirty-seven years at Memorial Stadium are done and my Birds will fly to a new nest next year, a fancy retro-ballpark that the Joseph Kavanagh Company played a part in making. I played a part in making.

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Memorial Stadium. Page from 1991 Orioles Program.

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Depiction of Oriole Park at Camden Yards from 1991 Baltimore Orioles Program.

October 22

The focus of the Shop today is 160 bent tubes for a coil for Kelco. They are a pain because though a 180 degree bend would do, the design of the boiler requires a small “kick” of about 1-2 degrees as a second bend. Joe Kelly of Kelco and I share a laugh at the ridiculous tolerance called out on the drawing. I note it as a reminder but we make it work. Another order for C. R. Daniels is also finished.

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The Shop’sjob book entry. Kelco Compnay job. October 22, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. C.R. Daniels job. October 23, 1991.

October 26

It’s the weekend before Halloween and that means  time for a big party at the Belvedere. My friend Dave Muelberger’s parties are becoming legendary and Lethal Injection or the Lethal Boys as he calls us are the house band. Dave throws a party at least one Saturday a month but his birthday is Halloween and THOSE parties are epic. Tim, Ray and I kid Dave a lot about the irony of his birth on Halloween. The show goes well with a big crowd again. A lot of the  Archbishop Curley crew are there including our friends John Muldowney and Frank Czawlytko. Dave is in his full glory as he welcomes his guests and introduces the band. We blast into the Who’s “Substitute” on Dave’s cue. Our friend Dave’s style of play is very improvisational but he meshes well with our approach and sound. We roll through a mix of Bowie, Lou Reed, RUSH and Pink Floyd covers along with throbbing drone-like rock jams that may or may not have had Dave shouting random things into the microphone. I do bring a birthday smile to Dave’s face when we play “In Dreams,” the Roy Orbison tune used in the movie “Blue Velvet.” It’s one of Dave’s favorites and he mutters a shocked “a candy colored clown” as I strum the first chord. This was a great party and I felt we played well. It was a loud, late and long event and I find myself back on Bayonne Avenue just after 2 a.m. with my ears still ringing.

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Joe Kavanagh and Ray French. Lethal Injection Friends & Family Concert. Backyard of 1100 Krueger Avenue. July 13, 1991.

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Tim Heaps. Lethal Injection Friends & Family Concert. Backyard of 1100 Krueger Avenue. July 13, 1991.

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Ray French. Lethal Injection Friends & Family Concert. Backyard of 1100 Krueger Avenue. July 13, 1991.

October 27

The Minnesota Twins led by Kirby Puckett and pitcher Jack Morris beat the Atlanta Braves to win the World Series in seven games. I see very little of this World Series but for highlights on ESPN. We had the party last night, the practicing for it and today’s rehash of the whole evening. One highlight of the baseball season is Orioles’ shortstop Cal Ripken Jr. He batted .323 with 34 homers and won the MVP award. Cal’s a local boy and easily the Birds’ best player.

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Patrick Kavanagh. October 1991.

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Paul Kavanagh. October 1991.

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Patrick Kavanagh. October 1991.

October 30

Two orders of bent square tubes for Belfort are finished. We are getting better at these but it still requires a careful set up and many adjustments of the tubes after bending.  A good fixture is furnished with the tubes by Belfort but it’s aluminum. Aluminum varies a lot piece to piece. Stretch out and spring factors are tough to predict with the stuff. My father calls during lunch to let Ann, Jack and I know they are planning another trip to Florida in January. I mention to him I went to the last weekend at Memorial Stadium.

“I guess I wish I could have gone, J-Joe. We’re just happy here in Ocean City. I love it here but that was some old park.” I hear his hearty chuckle. “We played some good games. GOOD teams.”

“We did. So many games. It’s gonna be weird to see the Birds somewhere else.” I reply as I toss my balled up sandwich wrapper at the can, trashball style, missing brilliantly as Jack points and laughs at me.

My father’s voice breaks my amused glare at my brother. “Oh yeah, so so many. A lot of nights out there and some good baseball, kid. Real good baseball.” He pauses and my eyes move from Jack directly to the receiver. “All things change, Joe. No stopping it. This will probably be good for the club. You’ll see. Memorial was great but it was old. This is brand new but looks like an old style. I like what I’ve seen.”

Jack gives me a quick wave as he heads out to the Shop to get back to work. “Me too. It looks beautiful. I would love to go to the first game but I know that’s gonna be a tough ticket, Dad.”

“Oh I’m sure it will be. That’s going to sell out fast. You’ll have a devil of a time getting a ticket.” He clears his throat and continues. “Still, it looks like a great spot to watch a ballgame, Joe.”

“It sure does, Dad. I hope we see some good games there. You’ll have to come up for a game if I can pry you away from OC.” Ann begins waving at me that she needs to speak to him. “I gotta get going Dad and Ann needs to talk to you. You take it easy.”

“You too. I’ll get up for a game. We’ll figure it out.” I transfer his call to Ann’s phone then I return to a stack of quotes I need to tackle.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Two Belfort Instruments jobs. October 30, 1991.     

November 12

The workers are rolling some steel tubes for a museum display for Design and Production. The Shop gets a few jobs a year that has some small part in a museum. It isn’t a lot of work but I’ve noticed it increasing in the last three years. A few pipes for D-S Pipe and Supply are rolled and more of the channels for Anchor Fence as well.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Design and Production job. November 12, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. D-S Pipe job. November 12, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Two Anchor Fence jobs. November 8, 1991 and November 13, 1991.

November 21

The work has slowed a little as the cold weather arrives and everyone’s thoughts are on the holidays. Thoughts of turkey are on my mind and a Thanksgiving feast. For now, a dozen pipes for Anchor Fence are rolled in the R-5. These are another standard item for us often used as guards on bridges to keep people from climbing to the edge.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. November 21, 1991.

December. 12

A resurgence of work has us rushing about to finish up before Christmas. We decide to close for the full week between the 25th and New Year’s. Christmas Eve, Day and Day after are days we like to be closed and they all appear during the week this year so closing the other two days is logical. It will take quite a bit of work to complete what needs to be done but Ann, Jack and I are organized. A fountain sprayer tube is rolled for Fountain Craft today and a small bar for Warren-Ehret. The week is complicated when the Housing Authority sends in a rush heat exchanger repair job but Jack in his style jumped right on it and got it done.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret job. December 12, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Housing Authority of Baltimore City job. December 12, 1991.

December 20

This last day of work of 1991 comes early this year. Our sales were down from 1990 but all the OPACY work made last year particularly good. There is no Christmas party as there was in years long past but it’s a different time and everyone involved is happy to have a head start on the holiday. The extra time off is welcomed but we will all be prepared to hit it hard on January 2nd. I will swing by once during the week off to get the mail and check on things. The last pickups of the year are for Whiting Metals and Industrial Fabricators.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Whiting Metals job. December 20, 1991.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Industrial Fabricators job. December 20, 1991.

December 25

 

Christmas is at Birch Drive and once again not all can attend. As people and generations grow and get older, life is complicated. The Kavanagh’s know complicated as they managed to fit nine kids and two parents in a rowhouse in Highlandtown but we don’t live on Lakewood Avenue anymore. The party is still festive and fun. There are the usual holiday favorites and a bevy of desserts on hand. My siblings and I see each other less and less but for Ann and Jack and me. We catch up as we can and jokes are cracked and laughs shared. The low rumble of the party shushes as Dad sits and plays. Conversations are slightly muted and slowly but surely a semi-circle of family and friends gathers around. Voices are joined and we celebrate as we have always done. We’re a crowd but I don’t think any of us would have it any other way. I take the chilly drive home to Bayonne with thoughts of the New Year in mind. My sister Jackie, her husband Richard and their daughter Lisa are moving and they are putting their house in Dundalk on the market. Ann put the thought in my head to consider buying it. The house is in a nice neighborhood and not too far from work. Rent money is really tossed away whereas a house is an investment. I pull up at the old apartment house where I have lived for four years. The place has seen better days. There’s no doubt about that, and flashbacks of no hot water or no water at all pass before my eyes. I lock the door behind me and plop into a chair placing my bags of goodies down. I rarely leave a family event without food of some sort but the haul this year is particularly good. I open the large tin of chocolate chip cookies I receive every year from Mary and take out a handful. The Orioles are moving from the ballpark of my youth, the center of my youth. It’s sunk in completely now and I am looking forward to the new park oddly enough. If it’s good enough for the Birds, then I can make the move, be a grown up and buy a home. As I have a beer, I think of the party. Seeing my sisters and their families and Jack, Nancy and their boys gives me pause. I’d like to think some day I’ll find a girl. So far, it hasn’t worked out. I found a few but none who were looking for me. Perhaps, some day I’ll have two sons like my father, grandfather, great-grandfather and brother. Maybe they will work with Jack’s two sons. That would be something. It would be a very Kavanagh way to do things. It definitely sounds like the Shop to me.

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Jack Kavanagh Sr. and grandson Paul Kavanagh. 1991.

 

 

George H.W. Bush is the President of the United States. Queen Elizabeth II becomes the first British monarch to address the US Congress. The United States and the Soviet Union agree to the START treaty which limits strategic nuclear weapons. The USSR is dissolved by the end of the year which ends the Cold War. Sharon Pratt Kelly becomes the first African-American woman mayor of a major US city, Washington D.C. The Galileo becomes the first spacecraft to get close in proximity to an asteroid. “Magic” Johnson of the LA Lakers announces he has the AIDS virus and retires from basketball. Gene Roddenberry, Dr. Seuss, Miles Davis, Martha Graham and Redd Foxx die.

There are 50 states in the Union.

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Memorial Stadium fascade from 1991 Baltimore Orioles Program.

To read prior posts, click on the  Table of Contents link below:

Table of Contents

1990 Patrick Kavanagh

January 2

The Joseph Kavanagh Company begins another year with the original Joe’s great great grand nephews and niece running the place now. The Shop has been located at the busy corner of Pratt and Central for nearly eighty years. Much of the talk of Baltimore is the new baseball stadium being built downtown. Enthusiasm has been building. I feel it. Suddenly fans face the reality of it. Old Memorial Stadium will close at the end of next season and a fancy retro ballpark will be the new home of the Baltimore Orioles. It feels strange but exciting. Over the holiday I spoke to my Dad and both of us wondered if the Shop might get some work from the new stadium. The first job of the year is finished, picked up and billed, six stainless steel flat bars rolled for the Warren-Ehret Company.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret job. January 2, 1990.

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Jack and Paul Kavanagh. 6 Kensington Parkeway 1990.

January 11

An order for seventeen 2 1/2” pipes for Codd Fabricators is completed. Their truck makes the short drive from Aliceanna to Central and the pieces are out the door. We have a one week backlog and are steadily receiving orders so it’s a good start to the year. On the books, we have some angle flanges to make, several rail jobs and some aluminum angles for a commercial sign for Belsinger Sign Works.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job. January 11, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Belsinger Sign Works job. January 16, 1990.

January 28

The San Francisco Forty-Niners crush the Denver Broncos 55-10 to win the Super Bowl. It’s as lopsided as it sounds with the winners scoring two touchdowns in each quarter. I’m not watching,  but jamming in the garage at LaSalle with the rest of Lethal Injection. Chris, Ray, Tim and I are still having a lot of fun playing and we are getting better,  but it’s often two steps forward/one step back. Still, we feel more comfortable playing as one and we have a few songs we can perform.

January 29

My brother Jack and his wife Nancy welcome Patrick Henry Kavanagh to the family early on this Monday. Mom and the new baby are doing well and my brother is as happy as he can be. He now has two sons just like his father, grandfather and great-grandfather. Patrick is named after one of America’s founders and by chance his great-great-great grandfather.

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Patrick Kavanagh. 1990.

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Jack Kavanagh holding sons, Paul and Patrick Kavanagh. 1990.

January 31

Jack is in the office today and talking about his new son, Patrick. It makes me smile to see him so happy. If there ever was someone who was born to be a Dad, it would be him. Not to mention, he learned from the best. In the Shop, several big structural angles are rolled for Codd Fabricators and Jack interrupts his gushing about his boy to anneal some brass tubes for Lenderking Metal Products.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job. January 31, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Lenderking Metal Products job. February 1, 1990.

February 15

Major League Baseball owners lock out the players and put a hold on Spring Training until a new Collective Bargaining Agreement is reached. Ann, Jack and I talk about it in the office. I can’t believe they are going to hold up this season over money. It seems silly to me and I hope they can swallow some pride on both sides and come to an agreement. We have caught up a little on the work but remain steady enough for the winter.

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Jack, Joe and Paul Kavanagh. 6 Kensington Parkway. 1988.

February 16

Two channels are rolled for Ackerman and Baynes Fabricators, a repeat of a job from last month. A smaller channel is curved into a ring for McShane Bell Foundry. The channel ring is the circle where the bell hangs and swings. A group of flat bars for Price Brothers is finished also.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Two Ackerman and Baynes jobs. January 23, 1990 and February 16, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Two McShane Bell Foundry jobs. February 13, 1990 and February 16, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Price Brothers job. February 16, 1990.

March 5

A large order of copper pipes bent in the Pines is billed to Gischel Machine today and the crew also are working on a set of flat bars to re-roll for Price Brothers and two for Warren-Ehret. Work wise, we’ve seen much worse winters.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Gischel Machine job. March 5, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Price Brothers job. March 6, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret job. March 6, 1990.

March 8

Today the R-6-S is put to the test as we roll a big 3” X 1/1/4” Steel flat bar into a small ring for Codd Fab. We know the machine can handle it. This is a repeat of a job from January but it is enough strain for the 6 to squeak and squawk a bit. The bar looks good. A very true even curve and nice and flat. I have my guitar in the office with me today as I am driving over to my sister Nancy’s house for dinner and I will give some short guitar lessons. Now I have a second niece who is interested in playing. Nancy’s second daughter Katie has joined Maura in learning the instrument. I don’t go every week now. I’m often too tired from work or racing to practice but I go over at least once a month. I love teaching them both even the basics. If Maura always was the rock n roll type from when she was small, Katie was always a rebel. I like that in a person.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Two Codd Fabricators jobs. January 22, 1990 and March 8, 1990.

March 15

Two new orders for Anchor Fence are finished. These are rolled channels with two bends for tops of gates and rails. Usually we bend pipe for Anchor but we are getting more of these channel tops and we’ve learned how to get the s-shape needed. We are also working on some structural tubes for Codd Fab. They were filled with rosin and are being rolled today. After melting out tomorrow, they will be ready.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Two Anchor Fence jobs. March 9, 1990 and March 15, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job. March 16, 1990.

March 18

A new four year deal is reached between baseball owners and players and the season is on. Spring Training is almost completely canceled by the lockout and the season will be extended by three days to allow a complete 162 game schedule to be played.

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Patrick Kavanagh. 1990.

March 29

A rush pipe order is banged out for Gischel Machine and when their truck gets here, they bring in two more orders, one for rolled flat bars and one for rolled pipes. In addition to these Gischel jobs, we have our usual assortment of railings, flanges, some stainless steel flat bars for Bengies Welding and a set of angles for Warren-Ehret.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Gischel Machine job. March 29, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Gischel Machine job. April 3, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Gischel Machine job. April 3, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Bengies Welding job. April 3, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret job. April 3, 1990.

April 19

The Baltimore Orioles opened up on the road this year but are welcomed home on this Thursday. The fans are amped after last year’s surprising second place finish along with all the hype of the new ballpark. The Birds beat the Tigers 4-2 today but this year will not be a repeat of last. The team’s play is fair at best through out the year and they will not be returning to the playoffs at season’s end.

April 25

A steady rain seems appropriate on a dreary busy Wednesday. The middle of the week with two more days to go adds to the somber mood brought on by the weather. It’s a day when the circle of coffee drinking workers is particularly quiet during their breaks and the hours drip by like the rain. A fountain sprayer tube ring is rolled while a set of pipes is bent in the old Pines Bender for Whiting Metals.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Whiting Metals job. April 25, 1990.

April 27

The Washington Capitals beat the New York Rangers 2-1 in overtime and for the first time in their history, they are advancing to the Eastern Conference Finals to face the Boston Bruins. The Caps dispatched the New Jersey Devils in the first round then took care of the Rangers. Jack is so excited. His team is one series away from the Stanley Cup Finals.

May 3

I receive a call from Ferdie at Eastern Ornamental Iron. He has a rail job for us to roll for him. I tell him the sooner he gets it here, the sooner we can get it for him. We have a nice bit of work in the Shop, between one and two weeks of backlog and that’s close to perfect. Torches are blazing as a 6” X 4” tube is melted out. The torches are used to gradually melt the rosin in the tube which was there to protect it from collapsing. Melting tubes out is always hot but it’s the final step in a long process so there is solace in that. The piece is for American Iron Works, one of the Shop’s customers from the DC area.

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The Shop’s job book entry. American Iron Works job. May 3, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Eastern Ornamental Iron job. May 8, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Eastern Ornamental Iron job. May 8, 1990.

May 9

It seems as if every step for the Capitals will be taken slowly. They are swept by the Bruins and are out of the playoffs again. It’s disappointing but as Jack is quick to point out, they made if farther than they ever have before. Jack is even more confident that this team will soon reach its goal and win a championship.

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Paul Kavanagh. 1990.

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Patrick Kavanagh with Paul Kavanagh in tent in background. 1990.

May 18

A chilly Monday morning turns sunny as the Kavanagh’s and crew make a channel ring for a bell for McShane and curve some irregular aluminum extrusions for Belsinger Sign. The shapes are asymmetrical so an unusual set up is required but our variety of rollers makes it doable. After several samples and using different tools, the job is finished.

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The Shop’s job book entry. McShane Bell Foundry job. May 18, 1990.

May 22

We receive a larger order for rolled channels from Anchor Fence. Thirty-two of the channels we’ve been developing with an offset curve for the tops of gates. The more of these we can get, the more likely we can find a way of doing a production run.  Thirty-two is a nice jump from four or eight. Also, a few more of Belsinger’s extrusions are rolled in the R-3-S.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. May 22, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Two Belsinger Sign Works jobs. May 18, 1990 and May 23, 1990.

June 7

A 5” pipe elbow is delivered today to Price Brothers and a repeat order for COVCO is picked up. We do these pipes for COVCO a few times a year. We bend, trim and thread the pipes. We generally stay away from threading but for a regular customer, we make an exception.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Price Brothers job. June 7, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Two COVCO jobs. May 1, 1990 and June 7, 1990.

June 17

It’s my 25th birthday and I’m playing in the garage with my fellow Lethal Injection members. The band is thinking of having a party or cook out along with a concert in Tim’s backyard. We could set it up for the Fall and our family and friends could see us play. It would be good practice for the future as well. I have a busy week ahead of me at the Shop. We’re finishing a big order for Codd Fabricators of 7” flat bars rolled, 120 of them. Also Anchor Fence is sending in a custom version of the channel tops we’ve been making. These are different from the standard forms but I want to keep the customer happy so we’ll figure it out.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job. June 18, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. June 19, 1990.

June 25

The band has made our decision and we will pick a day in October for our party. This puts pressure on us to have a set list and be prepared. We’ve developed a list of covers we do in a range of quality but we’ll firm them all up for the show. The Shop has been busy and me with it. Today fifteen 90 degree pipe elbows are made for Anchor Fence.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. June 25, 1990.

June 29

The crew draw the short straw today because we have five stainless steel tubes to fill, roll and sandblast for Bengies Welding. It’s a tough job in June. There’s a lot of torch work and the sandblasting requires isolation at the end of the alley with your face and hands well covered. The sand gets everywhere and it can not be rushed no mater how much you try.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Bengies Welding job. June 29, 1990.

July 13

I’m driving past Northern Parkway on my way home. I had dinner at Nancy’s and played some guitar with her daughters. They both are learning and can play a bit. I have a lot of fun but I’m tired. It’s been a long week and I’m going over tomorrow’s schedule in my head. We have a set of copper heater tubes to bend for Stambaugh and a few small angles for Lenderking. I’m looking forward to a week’s vacation next month. It will be more time to play and practice with the band but some time for sleep too.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Lenderking Metal Products. July 13, 1990.

July 19

The Birds are stuck in fourth place and can’t seem to make it to a .500 record. Fortunately, my fandom has diminished and I am far more interested in music these days. Tim, Ray, our friend Dave Muelberger and I attend David Bowie’s Sound and Vision tour at Merriweather Post Pavilion. The show is incredible and Bowie’s band is amazing. After the concert, we head to the bar Max’s on Broadway. Tim works the door there and the prior evening Adrian Belew, who is playing guitar on Bowie’s tour, showed up. We decide to hang in Max’s with the hope of meeting Belew. He wanders in and says hi to the owner and the bartender. We saw him play at Max’s before and I caught a drumstick he threw into the crowd. Adrian Belew is a guitarist but plays drums and other instruments as well. We approach him and he’s a gracious welcoming fellow. We have a beer with him and talk music. He’s very friendly and when I tell him he is the reason I bought a guitar synthesizer, he smiles then grabs a red marker from the bar and promptly signs my Adrian Belew tour shirt. Belew is one of my guitar heroes and now I have had the good fortune to meet both he and Robert Fripp, the two-headed guitar monster that was in King Crimson in the early 80s.

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Drumstick caught at Adrian Belew “Mr. Musichead” show at Max’s on Broadway.

July 24

A humid day on Central Avenue can get unbearable fast and so it is today. The men work through it and  with the added incentive of vacation looming, the jobs are cranked out. Five big bars are rolled the hardway for Ackerman and Baynes along with three sets of pipe rings and a fancy brass railing.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Ackerman and Baynes Fabricators job. July 24, 1990.

August 6

The week of vacation is here and there is much rejoicing. The crew and the Kavanagh’s mark this week on the calendar every year and look forward to it. A full week without work is a great thing particularly if you work at Pratt and Central and it’s August. I spend the week relaxing, sleeping and practicing with the band. We have picked October 14th for our concert for friends and family in Tim’s backyard. We’ll feed them and hopefully entertain them. We start making plans immediately and Tim’s parents, Barry and Madge, are happy to host.

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Flyer for Lethal Injection’s Flyer for Family and Friends Concert. October 14, 1990.

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Jack, Nancy, Paul and Patrick Kavanagh. 304 11th Street, Ocean City, MD. August 1990.

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Jack Jr., Paul and Patrick Kavanagh. Ocean City, MD. 1990.

August 14

We are playing catch up at 201 S. Central Avenue and paying the price for taking a week off. The place is full of steel and aluminum and that is a nice welcome back. Some angles are picked up by Ackerman and Baynes who are easily one of our most reliable regular customers. If Codd is number one, Ackerman is close behind.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Ackerman and Baynes Fabricators job. August 14, 1990.

August 22

A set of zee bars are rolled today for Belsinger Sign Works. We’ve only tried zees twice before, once with success and once without. The problem is keeping all the legs straight. An angle roller is made to support two legs but with some use of spacers, some adjustments and some trial and error, the pieces look good. I have a stack of job cards on my desk for tomorrow including a set of small angle rings for the Warren-Ehret Company.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Belsinger Sign Works job. August 22, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret job. August 24, 1990.

September 7

The strong summer continues with its usual assortment of railings, flanges and lintels augmented with nearly five hundred 1” Square steel tubes to bend for Anchor Fence. It’s the sort of job where a mechanic develops the job then passes it on to one of the helpers who has some experience on the machine, enough to be safe anyway. It serves two purposes. It makes the job cheaper and it gives the worker another level of experience. This is right up my brother’s alley and he finds a way to factor in the springback and stretch out on the tubes and quickly has it ready for one of the crew to crank them out.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Anchor Fence job. September 7, 1990.

September 11

Codd Fabricators sends in some angles for a job for the new ballpark. These will be used as concrete forms for the seating bowl. I had quoted Pete Kolb on three hundred or so 5” angles. He needed a working number as an estimate. I was shocked we received it and very excited. A job for the Birds, my father won’t believe it. I decide to call my Dad during lunch to tell him.

“Hey Dad!” I greet him after his usual truncated “Hel-lo.”

He replies. “How you doing Joe?” I can picture him in my mind’s eye. He knows I’m calling from the Shop and probably assumes I have a question or a problem. He is and will always be my go to expert in metal bending when I have an issue.

“I got some news. We got a nice job from Codd for the new stadium, the new ballpark for the Birds.” I can’t get the words out fast enough.

He answers quickly. “No kidding? That’s great.” Dad pauses then adds, “What kind of price did you give them?”

I’m not surprised at his query. I smile as I know it’s a Shop thing. It’s instinct at this point for him even though he’s retired. “About $ 32.00 each.”

“Hmm. That sounds like a good price, Joe. How many is it gonna be? Three hundred you say?” My smile broadens because I know he knows this is enough to make money on the job.

“The total will be over three hundred. We got fifty-four in today. Pete said they will keep sending then in for the next few months but we’re getting a big batch in October. Two hundred and sixty-three.” I lean back in my chair sipping some water.

“TWO-HUNDRED AND SIXTY-THREE? Holy Moley! Where you gonna put them all?” I can feel the surprise and excitement in his voice. I know that feeling.

I place my water on my desk and glance over at Ann who’s listening. I’m sure she knows he’s excited to hear this news. “That’s twenty-two tons, Dad but we’ll stack them in the back. We cleared a space past the R-6-S to pile the finished pieces. It will be fine.”

The phone is quiet for a moment. “Pretty good, Joe. Sounds like a helluva job to me.” He chuckles softly to himself. “Twenty-two tons and its for the Birds’ new stadium. That’s great. My grandfather Joe would love it. He loved baseball and the old Orioles. You know.”

“I do.” I recall  the many stories about Crazy Joe and how he loved the game. “It’s going to be closer to thirty tons by the time we’re all finished. We’ll make a few bucks on this one too, Dad.”

“He’d love that too. Believe me Joe. The only things he loved more than baseball were music and the Shop making money.” My father often spoke to me of his grandfather and told me how much I reminded him of Crazy Joe. The shared name and love of music is connection enough but apparently, our personalities are similar.

I take a quick breath. “Yeah, I sort of know what that’s like.”

My father laughs. “I guess you do. I guess you do.”

“I gotta get back to work, Dad. I just wanted to tell you about this one. I knew you’d want to know.” I begin gathering some job cards to take out to the Shop.

“Yeah, get back to work but I’m glad you called. Working for the Orioles’ new ballpark? I love it, kid. Talk to you soon.” The phone clicks and I place the receiver down. I sit and enjoy the moment briefly, then get up and head out the office door to distribute a couple of cards.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job for OPACY. September 11, 1990.

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Jack Sr., Jack Jr., Paul and Patrick Kavanagh. 1990.

September 12

The Shop is busy and about to get much busier. We have fifty pieces of big angle to roll for what will be called Oriole Park and quite a few other smaller orders including two bent brass rods for Lenderking, three channels for McShane Bell and a set of aluminum tee bars for Codd. The tees are unrelated to Oriole Park but for the same customer.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Lenderking Metal Products job. September 12, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. McShane Bell Foundry job. September 12, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job. September 13, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job for OPACY. September 18, 1990.

September 25

I’m on the phone throughout the day with customers, as summer seems to have not ended. We’ve completed another order for the stadium along with a regular order from EDCO of rods and pipes. A delivery is made to Price Brothers and a set of tubes for a condenser is completed for Warren-Ehret.  The R-6-S has been busy every day working on more angles for the seating bowl of the new stadium. We received the two hundred and sixty-three lengths from Codd. That’s a total weight of over forty five thousand pounds. That’s a lot of handling and careful unloading to get the material off the truck but it’s well worth it. The same care will be taken in stacking and storing the angles for pick up. The order will be finished in a couple of days but they are piling up now. Tomorrow we start on two 5” X 1” Brass flat bars rolled to a small diameter of 34”. These will be tough but I know the boys can handle it. The question is to anneal or not to anneal. I know it’s naval brass and fairly soft so I decide to roll them hard. They do roll fine with no damage. The Shop is hitting on all cylinders now.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Equipment Development Corporation(EDCO) job. September 25, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Equipment Development Corporation(EDCO) job. September 25, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Price Brothers job. September 25, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret job. September 25, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Gischel Machine job. September 27, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job for OPACY. October 4, 1990.

October 5

The Washington Capitals start their 17th season tonight hosting the Pittsburgh Penguins. The Penguins win 7-4 but the fans have high expectations for this season. Jack included. The team went farther in the playoff than ever before last season and we are hopeful this is a sign of things to come.

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Paul Kavanagh with Jack Kavanagh Jr.’s legs in background. 6 Kensington Parkway. 1990.

October 14

Lethal Injection welcomes their family and friends to a musical show in the Heaps’ backyard at 1100 Kreuger Avenue. There is plenty of food, drink, the musical stylings of Lethal Injection and even a cake. The cake with a hypodermic needle seemed to give the baker pause but he made it none the less. We are nervous but once we start, I love it. I’ve enjoyed playing at Dave’s a few times over the last year but this is a little different. These are not really your rock and roll crowd but our curious families. They have been wondering what we’ve been doing with our lives and they get a taste of it today. We all bemoan the sound, the mix and some of our performance but still, I’m pleased and it was fun. The set list includes RUSH, Pink Floyd and U2 covers along with Psycho Killer and the very popular Preamble to the Constitution from the School House Rock TV Series.

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Lethal Injection cake. Lethal Injection Backyard Show. 1100 Kreuger Avenue. October 14, 1990.

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Lethal Injection Backyard Show. 1100 Kreuger Avenue. October 14, 1990.

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Lethal Injection Backyard Show. 1100 Kreuger Avenue. October 14, 1990.

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Lethal Injection Backyard Show. 1100 Kreuger Avenue. October 14, 1990.

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Crowd photo. Lethal Injection Backyard Show. 1100 Kreuger Avenue. October 14, 1990.

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Crowd photo. Lethal Injection Backyard Show. 1100 Kreuger Avenue. October 14, 1990.

October 16

I sit at my desk with some mixed feelings about the show this weekend. It was fun and people seemed to enjoy it though some clearly were not into our music. Not everybody is a rocker. I pull myself from my daze and answer the phone. Bud from Gischel Machine is calling to check on some copper pipes we are bending. We did several hundred a month ago and they needed two hundred more. It’s a great job for us, a production order and it’s ready. He sends his truck right over.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Gischel Machine job. October 16, 1990.

October 20

The Cincinnati Reds sweep the heavily-favored Oakland Athletics to win the World Series. The success of last year’s Orioles’ “Why Not?” year did not continue. The Birds languished along all year below .500 and finished in 5th of seven teams in the A.L. East. The only positive thing about it is the Yankees finished in last. That made everything more palatable but mostly I am more involved with the band and the Shop to be as active of a fan as I was. I don’t see any of the four games in the World Series as most nights I am practicing or hanging out with the guys in the garage. We enjoyed our backyard show overall and look forward to another birthday party for Dave at the Belevedere next week.

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Lethal Injection Backyard Show. 1100 Kreuger Avenue. October 14, 1990.

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Lethal Injection Backyard Show. 1100 Kreuger Avenue. October 14, 1990.

October 22

My brother Jack jumps right into a job for Whiting Metals today. We have a little trouble getting the radius they need and Jack is quick to take the thing over. He is a natural in the Shop and working with metals. He has a lot of experience in pipe and tube bending and a knack for solving these kinds of problems. The rest of the boys are split between jobs for McShane Bell, Durrett Sheppard and a small order for the G-S Company.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Whiting Metals job. October 22, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. McShane Bell Foundry job. October 22, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Durrett Sheppard Steel job. October 24, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Durrett Sheppard Steel job. October 24, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. G-S Company job. October 24, 1990.

October 27

We are at the Belevedere and it’s loud and moderately insane. A mob of people have shown up this year and everyone seems to be more in the holiday spirit. A lot of folks are in costume including my sister Ann and her friend Mary Sterling who attend out of curiosity I suspect. We rock through a lot of improvised tunes, along with some covers, our usual mix of progressive rock and the odd blues number. Dave seems to have developed a reputation for his parties as the crowd has gotten much bigger. It’s a great night and we load our vehicles up with gear and head home about 1 am.

November 5

November is upon the Shop and we still have plenty of work. Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday and every year after Halloween, I begin to think of a turkey dinner with all the trimmings especially parsnips. It’s the Kavanagh in me. November is usually good weather for work in a place like the Shop. It’s chilly but not so cold that a little work doesn’t warm you up. The very cold and the very hot are challenging. Somewhere in the middle is ideal. The crew labor away on some more window lintels, sixteen bar rings for Bengies Welding and two angle rings for Warren-Ehret  are rolled in the R-5-S.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Bengies Welding job. November 5, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret job. November 8, 1990.

November 14

With the approaching holidays the end of the year is coming too and we’ve been fortunate. While a recession has hit much of the country, we have had plenty of work most of the year. The stadium project has helped the Shop stay particularly busy for the last two months. We’ve rolled another order for the new ballpark, two 4” pipes for Codd that were not baseball related and a railing for G-S. We are nearly finished some flat bars for Price Brothers and a load of stainless steel angles and tubes comes in from Warren-Ehret, a good sized coil job for them with a lot of bending for us. There’s no doubt in my mind, the year will end strong.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job for OPACY. November 12, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Codd Fabricators job. November 14, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. G-S Company job. November 13, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Price Brother sjob. November 19, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret job. November 27, 1990.

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The Shop’s job book entry. Warren-Ehret job. November 27, 1990.

December 3

The year is nearly finished and the work has not slowed. We continue to receive more work for the new ballpark with add-ons and last minute changes. The standard COVCO order of galvanized pipes is shipped out today and an order of rolled bars for Price Brothers is begun.